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Author Topic: Ventilation holes..  (Read 3499 times)

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #20 on: November 25, 2006, 12:42:50 PM »
I'm not sure why you need so much room at the top, but the vent will allow ventilation and if the telescopic cover is slid forward it will let the bees out if the bottom entrance gets plugged.  Bees are creatures of habits so don't be surprised if it takes them a while to take advantage of it.
Michael Bush
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Offline 2-Wheeler

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2006, 07:31:56 PM »
Very clean and beautiful hive.  What is the apparatus on the front entrance that has the little holes in it.  I can't quite make out what it is.  Great day.  Cindi

Cindi,
Thanks, I painted it myself  :-D
The apparatus is a universal metal entrance reducer or mouse-guard. I found that one at Dadant: https://www.dadant.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=212

I'm not sure why you need so much room at the top, but the vent will allow ventilation and if the telescopic cover is slid forward it will let the bees out if the bottom entrance gets plugged.  Bees are creatures of habits so don't be surprised if it takes them a while to take advantage of it.


Michael,
Thanks again for your help. I have learned a lot from your webiste. Originally, the extra room up top was for the application of the Apiguard. You can see the tray in the top photo. The instructions said to put an empty super on top, but that seemed like an excessive amount of open space, so I made the small riser out of 1x2s and trimed the notch in it.  Now the mite treatment is over, but I thought of leaving it for ventilation. Some suggested simply proping up one end of the telescopic cover. I could have done that with some wedge shaped shims to block of the sides. 

This is my first hive, so I'm still trying to learn the best way to winter them in this climate of extreme temp swings: During most of the winter and early spring, the difference between the lowest possible temps and the highest is often about 100 degrees (F). For example lows of -20 to highs of 80 possible on any given day. They need to be protected from the bitter cold when it might drop to -20 overnight one day, then given enough ventilation to keep from baking when it goes up to upper 70s or even 80 on a warm sunny day. I'm planning to add another hive in the sping - would the Polystyrene hive bodies be a good idea?
-David Broberg   CWOP#: CW5670 / CoCoRaHS #CO-BO-218
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2006, 09:40:34 PM »
>I'm planning to add another hive in the sping - would the Polystyrene hive bodies be a good idea?

I have four that I never use, but that's mostly because they aren't eight frames.  :)  They wouldn't cut down very easily.

The one by two frame makes a great baggie feeder.  You put three quarts of syrup in a gallon zip lock baggie and put it on top of the frames with the one by two to make some room.  It would also work nicely for Mountain Camp's (from beesource) version of winter emergency feed.  He puts a newspaper on the top bars and pours sugar on top of that.   Baker's sugar (extra fine) would work even better.

But if you're not doing one of those things, it seems like just more empty space.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2006, 11:27:06 PM »
A solid bottom board turned upside down is a migratory top with a top entrance.
Life is a school.  What have you learned?   :brian:      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!

Offline Mici

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2007, 02:48:40 PM »
reviving this one!
OK, i want to make some ventilation holes, of course i'll wait 'till spring, but i'll try it on the two hives that are still empty. ok making a few holes just under the cover-top of the hive really isn't that big of a deal but i have something else to ask you. i have read that small tubes for entrance also prevent robbing, tubes are important for my top entrance since i don't want to do more than neccesary. anyway, i'll drill 3-5 little holes, and insert a tube, because the hive has an insulation space, so they won't go in there. what i want to know is, what is the minimum size of the tubes i should use, so they'd also help against robbing? 5mm?

if bee cells are 5,4 (currently, i'll try to go to natural size) 5mm sounds a bit...small, 7mm? please help!

Offline Finsky

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #25 on: January 24, 2007, 02:51:28 PM »
reviving this one!

if bee cells are 5,4 (currently, i'll try to go to natural size) 5mm sounds a bit...small, 7mm? please help!

15 mm hole is good for upper entrance. It does not develope robbing.

Offline Cindi

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #26 on: January 24, 2007, 08:00:40 PM »
I have a Bamix.  If any of you own one in your home you will know what I mean.  It is a device similar to a Braun, you know what I mean if you have one.  This Bamix is warranted for 5 years, home use or commercial use.  The most important tool in my kitchen.

I make powdered sugar out of granular sugar.  I make fluffy snow out of ice cubes (without the use of water of any sort).

Now, I think that if I were to do the emergency feeding with granulated sugar for the bees, I would use the Bamix and make fluffy sugar, would certainly make it easier, as mentioned, for the bees.  Great day.  Cindi
There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service

Offline Mici

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Re: Ventilation holes..
« Reply #27 on: March 05, 2007, 05:33:36 PM »
reviving this one!

if bee cells are 5,4 (currently, i'll try to go to natural size) 5mm sounds a bit...small, 7mm? please help!

15 mm hole is good for upper entrance. It does not develope robbing.

the question!!! is one 15mm hole enough?

i made emergency upper entrances for my bees this year. the entrance is....about 5cm long and 5mm high. BUT, when i opened the hive, it was all moldy -the upper compartment of course, the brood nest is intact though.

now, i was planing to make 4 holes with 6mm diameter in each hive. let's say hives are the size of a deep. will the 4 holes do it? or should i make larger holes? even fewer?
anyway, HELP NEEDED!!!

 

anything