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Author Topic: Carnivores!  (Read 2488 times)
nepenthes
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« on: September 25, 2006, 07:18:04 PM »

Ok... so Im not sure IF I can post non-bee related stuff hear..

but I am gonna take a swing at it and do it any ways....

N. gymnamphora


N. muluensis x lowii


Both Nepenthes sp's!  I have others... but they arent happy I just built them a Bog, and well US native CP's dont like to be transplanted to often expecialy when Its not time for them to go dormant. (the pictures are tropical CP's not Temperate)
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Mici
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2006, 06:34:03 PM »





I like 'em, but they always die, i mean i have never had one for more than a few months. maybe i should stick stuff into the clamps all the time evil angry can't help myself, it's fun looking at them closing
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qa33010
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2006, 03:35:38 AM »

   We were able to get a couple to last about a year.  Our local garden center owner told us that each 'mouth' (he told us the right phrase) is good for three times before they begin to die off.  My kids remember what to do to keep them alive.  I keep wanting to watch them close too. evil
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Everyone said it couldn't be done. But he with a chuckle replied, "I won't be one to say it is so, until I give it a try."  So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin.  If he had a worry he hid it and he started to sing as he tackled that thing that couldn't be done, and he did it.  (unknown)
nepenthes
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« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2006, 06:59:48 AM »

lol Pure Water (stuff like rain water or R/O water if you know what that is) Is Good water to use, other waters from tap usualy have to many salts and minerals for CP's. And Nutrient Free soil is good too so sphagnum peat moss is good, and using a little bit of live sphagnum doesnt look to bad either. They require dormancy int he winter months and LOTS and lots of sun in the summer months (Venus flytraps, and youre S. purpurea the one with the pitchers) With lots of sun they wont die, They get lots of coloration, deep reds usualy. The water level should be boggy, I usualy have mine (when in pots) 1 inch - 2 inches. The pots I use are usualy 6 inch pots. Just as long as theirs lots of wet soil CP's are happy!

Heres my set up from befor... its really the only good photo I have of a good set up to start with.
*cringes*
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y17/alaskaheadbanger/Carnivors/a74abf83.jpg

and my Freshly Made Set up, its a Bog Made with a pre fashioned pond.
/a74abf83.jpg
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Cindi
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2006, 09:09:06 AM »

N. gymnamphora.  What an incredible, ugly, interesting plant that is.  I did not realize there were so many carniferous plants.  With this one, n. gymnamphora, what does it "eat".  It would look like maybe insects would climb inside it, it looks like an elongated pouch of some sort.  How much work are these to maintain?  All the kids around here would probably have a wonderful time looking after these. great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
nepenthes
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2006, 02:46:41 PM »

Nepenthes Is an entire genra wich N. gymnamphora is a part of. Nepenthes are tropical and do not require dormancy but some require warmer temperatures or higher huidty all the nepenthes I keep dont need that though. Most CPs are easy to keep it just takes practice. If you can keep a venus Flytrap alive through a Season You are well on youre way to CP wonderland! CP's do not need to be feed to be kept alive. They just need wet soil and Lots of light and you are on youre way.
 grin

Click for larger images

(Older but not mature )N. ventricosa


N. x 'Judith Finn' (now has 6 inch pitchers)



(Young) N. Sanguinea


(Young) N. ventricosa


They are all mostly young nepenthes.
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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2006, 08:35:55 AM »

I don't understand the plant.  What is the purpose of the "pitcher" you called it, I am curious why it has an opening at the top, is it hollow inside?  I have never tried even to keep a Venus flytrap, so these are curious items surely.  Great day. Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
nepenthes
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« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2006, 03:22:36 PM »

Pitcher plants in the wild are deprived of nutrience. plants can abosorb nutrience through their leaves. Now some plants (Bromeliads for example) Catch water naturaly. Some species developed This.  And It over time changed into what we see today. Pitchers are for catching bugs. The traps stay open and The preay gets attracted to a sweet smelling and tasting necar that is produce along the peristome (the lip of the plant) some produce mild intoxicating affects causing the insect to fall into the pitcher full of digestive juices very mild form of it. The walls halfway up have kind of a WAXY coat on them so its hard to get a grip on it. their for drowning the insects.

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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
Cindi
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« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2006, 11:33:14 PM »

Pitcher plants in the wild are deprived of nutrience. plants can abosorb nutrience through their leaves. Now some plants (Bromeliads for example) Catch water naturaly. Some species developed This.  And It over time changed into what we see today. Pitchers are for catching bugs. The traps stay open and The preay gets attracted to a sweet smelling and tasting necar that is produce along the peristome (the lip of the plant) some produce mild intoxicating affects causing the insect to fall into the pitcher full of digestive juices very mild form of it. The walls halfway up have kind of a WAXY coat on them so its hard to get a grip on it. their for drowning the insects.



Tell me more, this is fascinating.  Do you think that bees could get in there or would bother?  Would they get intoxicated by this plant?  Any known information about what type of prey which is attracted to these carnivores?  I guess I could look it up, but I am too lazy.  I heard that Bromeliads are great for purifying the air, as are bees wax candles.  Great day. Cindi 
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
nepenthes
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« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2006, 07:02:55 AM »

 Undecided

What are you talking about? Almost any insect is attracted to CP's some are better at certain prey you can just ask me if theirs 1 type of Prey. Yore questions need to be a little more specific. If you go look around you will find tons of information, and if you are interested you can buy them places on line.

Bee's Honestly wouldn't be as attracted to Certain species of CP, I'm almost certain of it of course I haven't really checked out if they are or not. But their would only be a few casualty's and nothing that would be devastating to a colony.

You have to remember theirs over 15 different kinds of CP. So you're questions should probably be a little less vague.
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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
Cindi
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« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2006, 08:09:44 AM »

OK.  I'll do that, look up on the net about these species of plants, I won't be so lazy.  Very interesting how they have evolved.  Thanks for the information.  Great day.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
nepenthes
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« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2006, 03:03:54 PM »

Here is a forum I almost forgot you will see me on their as nepenthes_ak

http://www.terraforums.com
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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
mick
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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2006, 03:03:37 AM »

We have drosseras here. I like them.
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nepenthes
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« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2006, 09:37:03 AM »

 grin

Seeing Carnivorous plants in the wild is twice as much satisfying as growing them. Where are you?
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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
nepenthes
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« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2006, 01:51:37 AM »

you have Pygmy Drosera!!!  shocked

so beautiful species! Pygmy drosera... are VERY tiny, usualy about 1-2 cm's!
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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
mick
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« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2006, 01:40:46 AM »

Thats a great looking bog Nepo. I am going to grab a few buckets of soil from varying depths form the wetlands that are drying up here. Theres a chance that some seeds that have lain dorment for decades might germinate.
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nepenthes
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« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2006, 09:17:49 PM »

A small chance yea, But I would look for gemmena they produce little baby plant structures that get flung away from the adult plants. I dont know when that season is though.
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"I have never wished to cater to the crowd, for what I know they do not approve, and what they approve I do not know." - Epicurus.
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