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Poll
Question: How many have an Epi Pen
Yes - 21 (41.2%)
No - 30 (58.8%)
Total Voters: 48


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Author Topic: Epi Pen  (Read 11111 times)
NCBee
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« on: September 23, 2006, 04:50:02 PM »

How many have an Epi Pen.  Local beekeepers meeting this month, some discussion was made about a class by a neighboring county to become certified to use an epi pen.  This is also part of the master beekeepers certification for our state.  Just curiouse as to how many beekeepers have on handy.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2006, 04:53:34 PM »

I have to wonder how to answer this one. My friend and his wife live with us and because of his many health problems and alergies he always has the epi pens around, but I don't.  huh Huummmm  rolleyes  Guess I'll vote yes
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2006, 06:36:50 PM »

I had bees since 1974.  I've never even SEEN an epipen.
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Michael Bush
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Zoot
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« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2006, 10:59:04 PM »

This is really embarrassing...what is an Epi Pen?

Most people would of course at least Google an unknown term like that so they could quickly gather some sort of knowledge of the subject. I just thought I'd try the old fashioned way and ask....
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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2006, 04:36:19 PM »

i keep epinephrine in the barn and in the horse trailer.  almost lost a horse out from under me once when she panicked on a narrow trail over top of a yellow jacket nest.  had to walk her all the way down the mountain side...and i do my own immunizations.

an epi pen is not a bad idea.  if you have guests, or kids play around, it wouldn't hurt.  even a person who has been stung before, can develop an allergy to bee stings out of the blue.  that said, anyone who knows they are allergic, probably already carries one, and the odds of you needing one are slim.

something to talk to your doc about.  

can't imagine a class on it.  not hard to pop a cap and stick yourself or someone else.  guess the class might teach you when to use one, but that should take about 5 minutes.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Jacmar
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« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2006, 09:03:58 PM »

I myself carry two epi-pens when I venture out to my Bee Yard. At 70 years old and can feel a little slowing down when it comes to doing physical labour and such I feel an Epi-pen is a requirement in my Bee tool box. Fortunatelly I have not had to use the pen but will always carry it even when we go camping in the bush country of Northern Ontario, you never know when you might run into something that could cause you problems.

For those who are unfamiliar with a Epi-pen I would suggest two things:

#1. Talk to your family doctor as he knows your history and whether you can safely use the pen. He will also explain what to look for and how to use it.

#2. Follow this link to all the Epin-pen information about symptoms,what it is used for, how to use it and when.

http://www.epipen.com/

NOTE: These pens are temperature sensitive and should not be left in a car or location where the temp can go high and ruin the Pen. I keep mine at the back door on the kitchen counter where the temp is fairly constant and it is the first thing into my pocket on the way out to the Bee yard,

I say carry one "It is better to be safe than sorry"

Jack
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Kirk-o
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« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2006, 05:14:31 PM »

I don't carry a epi pen I'm a beekeeper not a beain surgeon.I have talked to many people who have said they were allergic to bee stings
they say this to me when I'm catching a swarm and there are 500 bees flying around.I was getting a swarm one day and this women came out of Sears the swarm was on the corner of a camper truck I said " there are bees here on the truck you might want to go around the other way she turned and ran screamming bloody murder I think she was allergic to bees
kirko
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Mici
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« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2006, 01:36:58 PM »

i am seriusly thinking about buying-having something against beestings, i mean the real deal, not just to ease the pain. but just can't find the time to go buy some Smiley  i forget about it. well, when i got bees, like half of the village said they're allergic, but i just don't believe it, maybe a stronger reaction. i myself have a fair reaction to stings, but don't care, i just comfort myself saying-"at least i wont have reuma"
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kathyp
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« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2006, 04:11:56 PM »

you would only use an epi-pen in case of an anaphylactic reaction.  they are rare.  they are also fatal without immediate treatment.  it'a an odds thing.  

here's how i think about it:  there are lots of things that are out of my control.  because i tend to pick risky careers and hobbies (military and horses), the best i can do is evaluate risk, and try to cover all of the eventualities that i can reasonably cover.

i can't keep my horse from dumping me, but i can wear a helmet.  i can't keep an animal from having a reaction to an immunization, but i can keep the epi on hand.  i can't keep bees from stinging me but i can keep epi (human dose!!!!) on hand just in case.
the epi-pen is the easiest way to do that.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2006, 04:36:59 PM »

Quote from: kathyp
 i can't keep bees from stinging me but i can keep epi (human dose!!!!) on hand just in case.
the epi-pen is the easiest way to do that.


amatuer way.. pha, get rid of bees, now that's what i call getting the odds to a minimum cheesy  Cool
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kathyp
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« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2006, 05:17:56 PM »

now that wouldn't be ANY fun!!   Cheesy
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Ginger Bush
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« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2006, 10:42:27 AM »

Ron,

Say hello at the next beekeepers meeting at the Ag center in Winston. I've read your posts on the Guilford forum.

I am registered for the Epipen class. I have what I think are considered local large reactions, and think the class is a good idea. It could save my own, or I could help save someone's life who was allergic.
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JWW
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« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2006, 12:41:34 PM »

I worked as a Paramedic for many years and I have seen first hand the results from being able to inject the epi  in an allergic reaction before we would arrive. They have saved many lives and are not that expensive.

Most people know that they are allergic to stings or to "a" sting if severly allergic BUT even those of us that are not severly allergic to a sting or to a few stings probably would be in a case where we were stung numerous times. Case in point; locally we had a beekeeper that fell into his hive knocking it over. Before EMS and the FD arrived he was DOA from dozens of stings and had no known previous allergies.

We are probably all allergic at some point or degree, some more than others.

The redness and swelling we get from a sting or bite are actually mild allergic reactions.

Just my .02 cents worth.
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melliphile
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« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2006, 09:05:40 AM »

I keep two epi pens.  One where my hives are located and one in my toolbox.  I'm not allergic, and I know of no one who is truly allergic.  An ounce of prevention....  In this litigious society we live in,  anything one can do to cover one's ***, is probably a good idea.  I
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buzzbee
Ken
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« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2006, 12:21:39 PM »

What woul be the ramifications giving a epipen out of panic and they weren't actually in shock?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2006, 01:38:58 PM »

>What woul be the ramifications giving a epipen out of panic and they weren't actually in shock?

A sudden drop in blood pressure and likely death.  Nothing too serious.  Wink
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Michael Bush
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kathyp
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« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2006, 02:20:22 PM »

oh...come on now...it wouldn't do much to a healthy person except drive up the pulse, and make them feel crappy.....

now an unhealthy person...might be a different story cheesy
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
Michael Bush
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« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2006, 03:39:53 PM »

http://rds.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0geut8aoypFHDMBdQBXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE2N2g2ZzIzBGNvbG8DZQRsA1dTMQRwb3MDMTAEc2VjA3NyBHZ0aWQDREZYMV8x/SIG=12gcnecbq/EXP=1160508570/**http%3a//www.musc.edu/pharmacyservices/Drugs/E/Epinephrine.do

"Adverse Reactions Frequency not defined.
Cardiovascular: Tachycardia (parenteral), pounding heartbeat, flushing,
hypertension, pallor, chest pain, increased myocardial oxygen
consumption, cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, angina,
vasoconstriction
Central nervous system: Nervousness, anxiety, restlessness, headache,
dizziness, lightheadedness, insomnia
Gastrointestinal: Nausea, vomiting, xerostomia,dry throat
Genitourinary: Acute urinary retention in patients with bladder outflow
obstruction
Neuromuscular & skeletal: Weakness, trembling
Ocular: Precipitation or or exacerbation of narrow-angle glaucoma,
transient stinging, burning, eye pain, allergic lid reaction, ocular irritation
Renal: Decreased renal and splanchnic blood flow
Respiratory: Wheezing, dyspnea
Miscellaneous: Diaphoresis (increased)

"Drug Interactions Increased toxicity: Increased cardiac irritability if
administered concurrently with halogenated inhalational anesthetics,
beta-blocking agents, alpha-blocking agents"
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Michael Bush
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melliphile
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« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2006, 08:36:11 AM »

Ever read the side effects of aspirin?  Even something seemingly innocous as aspirin has claimed lives from allergic reactions or overdoses.
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Mici
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« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2006, 09:59:19 AM »

i think that all drugs have AT least this long list of side effects and risks, even natural herbs have it.
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