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Author Topic: Slatted rack used as an excluder  (Read 1110 times)
Zoot
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« on: September 05, 2006, 11:42:11 PM »

I guess this is a question for Brian,

I fabricated and installed several slatted racks in my hives (per the D.Bray specs) this summer and have been quite happy with them. I also installed one above the brood boxes in my most vigorous hive in the hope that it would function as an excluder.

I have been away for 8 days and just prior to leaving I had observed queen cells (4 or 5) being built in that hive. There was uncapped larva (though I didn't see any eggs)and a good quantity of capped brood so I was rather curious as to why this should be.

Upon returning and inspecting today I observed capped brood and larva ABOVE the upper slatted rack. There are both below also. There are now no queen cells in evidence anywhere. Could my original queen be alive and thriving, somehow having managed to get up throught the slatted rack? We are also having a good late flow here
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2006, 12:14:18 AM »

>>There are now no queen cells in evidence anywhere.

Bees will often begin to build queen cells at various times due to various stimuli and then tear them out again before using them for no obvious reason to the beekeeper.  I would say that was probably the case in the circumstance cited.

>>I observed capped brood and larva ABOVE the upper slatted rack.

I use 4 medium boxes for my brood chambers, If you are too then I refer you to my often made statement to allow the queen as much room as she wants, needs, or demands.  WIth every box the same size (medium) moving those frames down into the brood chamber and moving honey frames up is easily done.  Normally 4 mediums is as much room as the majority of queens need but there are exceptions--you may have one.

I'm glad to hear you like my DuBray Slatted Rack.  Smiley
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Zoot
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2006, 12:23:05 AM »

The DuBray slatted rack has become somewhat of a sensation around here. One of the inspectors has made some and several other locals are using them.  The feedback I've gotten has been positive.

Oh, I should have mentioned this - several of the queen cells (3 I think) had larva floating in royal jelly. They were capped.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2006, 12:31:37 AM »

For those curious about the DuBray Slatted Rack the September article I'm submitting to www.beekeepersvoice.com discribes their use and construction.  It should be posted sometime this week, I hope.  My column is titled: Beekeeping from a Wheelchair--because that's the way I do it.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2006, 01:27:48 AM »

Quote from: Brian D. Bray
For those curious about the DuBray Slatted Rack .


never heard of it, how is it different???
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Zoot
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2006, 09:33:33 AM »

I suppose I should allow Brian the honor of giving it's full description but the essential difference from those that are commercially available is that the bars are made from dowels rather than from square stock allowing the bees some extra space to cluster. Also the dowels run parallel to the frames rather than perpendicular, installed in manner that centers them under each frame enhancing ventilation and also allowing more open space for mite fall.

I also installed one above my brood boxes ( 4 eight frame mediums) in one hive to further aid in ventialtion (we had a very hot summer here) and to also act as an excluder to keep the queen out of the honey supers but in the latter case it does not seem to have worked. I now have 2 additional mediums with brood in addition to all the honey that is now being made. I'm a little perplexed as to how to proceed for the rest of the season. It's starting to look like one of the twin towers.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2006, 12:32:05 AM »

Jim,
Your testimonial sounds like a commercial.  You also do a very good job of explaining the difference.  I guess I'm going to have to get a camera and take pictures.  No doubt such would enhance my aticles at www.beekeepersvoice.com as a picture is worth a thousand words.

I think the queen going above the 2nd slatted rack is due more to the vitality of the queen plus the unusually warm summer than anything else.  This summer has been hot.  Here in the PNW we are closing in on 90 days without rain.  Seattle is in danger of loosing it's title of the Rain Capital of the USA.

Just put the brood frames in the supers down in the other 4 mediums when you harvest.  You can also shake the bees off and spread some of those frames out to the other hives that may not have as much brood in them.  The bees should reduce the egg laying soon.  I wouldn't be surprized if your next peek in the hive shows a entirely different story.
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