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Author Topic: Beekeeping  (Read 1715 times)

Offline RMC

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Beekeeping
« on: September 02, 2006, 05:42:07 PM »
Hi I am thinking about starting beekeeping, and want to build everything I will need. Which is the problem because I dont know what I need. I see the list of plans but there is so many, can you tell me which ones I will need?

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Beekeeping
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2006, 08:35:53 PM »
In starting out the Kiss (keep it simple solutions) method of beekeeping is best.  I would make all the boxes the same size--medium (16 1/4W X19 7/8L X 6 5/8D). Inner tops, telescopic top, slatted racks (to use instead of queen excluders), and screened bottom boards.  Other than your usual protective equipment and tools that's really all you need.  

You could go for the 8 frame width over the 10 frames which takes a 13 3/4 width.  It's lighter and easier to handle--a definite advantage as you get older and, in my case, more decrepit.
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Offline RMC

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Beekeeping
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2006, 02:35:09 AM »
Well I was thinking on the first plan on the list of plans given. So if I have all that now what do I do? Im thinking on buying a book on it but i just want to know a general idea of what to do.

Offline randydrivesabus

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Beekeeping
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2006, 01:11:40 PM »
you build a box (a hive body) with no top or bottom. the dimensions are critical to be able to use standardized parts and maximize interchangeablility between hive bodies. the joinery used to assemble the boxes can be anything from dovetails to box joints to rabbit joints to butt joints.
you then have to make frame and foundation decisions.
you should build an inner cover and a telescoping outter cover.
you should build a bottom board.
you'll need some kind of stand to keep the hive off the ground. concrete blocks also work for this.

of course you can say to hell with all this and just build top bar hives. they require less woodworking ability and are simpler.

Offline Brian D. Bray

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« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2006, 01:32:16 AM »
I do not recommend TBH for the beginner.  They have their own set of problems to deal with.
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Offline Michael Bush

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Beekeeping
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2006, 11:34:27 AM »
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnewbees.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm

Basically every hive needs a bottom and a lid.  Things like inner covers are nice, but not necessary.  Every hive will need several boxes for brood and more for honey.  I like all the same size boxes.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm#uniformframesize

I also like smaller lighter boxes.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm#lighterboxes

Then you ALWAYS need at least one spare top, bottom and several boxes.  These can be used to do a split, hive a swarm, or just use them while manipulating the hives so you don't have to set the boxes on the ground.

You need at least two colonies to have some resources to work with.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm  auf deutsche: bushfarms.com/de_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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