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Author Topic: Winter storage questions  (Read 1482 times)
2-Wheeler
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« on: August 30, 2006, 10:24:01 PM »

Another first year newbee question:

After we extracted the honey from the frames and returned the combs to the hive for three days, they cleaned out the remnants and began to pull the comb again and even fill some with new nectar.

Now we removed those frames and are wondering about winter storage of the empty super. We uncapped the combs and used the rotary extraction, so quite a bit of comb remains. I read that freezing is recommended, but how do do you put so many frames in the freezer? And how long do you leave them there?

What's the best way to remove the small amounts of new nectar that was added?  

Should the empty frames be bagged or otherwise sealed up during storage?
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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2006, 10:29:54 PM »

I take the whole super with frames still in it and put in a garbage bag and tie the bag close tight, put the whole thing in a chest freezer for atlest 24 hours, then take out and put in a second garbage bag tied tight, stack in my closed in back deck and leave till next spring, havent had any moth problems yet and they stack nice in a corner... so I end up with super in 2 garbage bags and it works fine for me...
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atthelake22
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2006, 04:27:03 PM »

I have a question too, again, first year taking over the apiary since my father passed away. He always stored the supers in the basement (with dehumidifier so it isn't damp down there) stacked upon one another. He put them in the freezer after taking off the hive cleaned out of course, for 24 hours and then I don't know what he did, BUT we put one from freezer in garbage bag and the condensation made it smell kinda sour. What was that? How do you avoid that? do you open up the bag until the frames and super come to room temperature? Just curious as to where all the condensation goes once it "thaws" out. Should the supers be stacked alternately or is it okay to stack directly one on the other without spaces? I know this was a lot on one entry to ask. But this is what i am facing too and need answers very much! Thanks so much!!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2006, 05:01:32 PM »

>I read that freezing is recommended, but how do do you put so many frames in the freezer?

You put in however many will fit at a time.

>And how long do you leave them there?

24 hours is good.

>What's the best way to remove the small amounts of new nectar that was added?

Put them above an inner cover on a hive.

>Should the empty frames be bagged or otherwise sealed up during storage?

I wouldn't.  I let the bees clean them dry, spray them with certan and stack them up in the apiary with a tight lid and bottom to keep the mice out.

http://www.beeworks.com/uscatalog/details/certan.asp
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atthelake22
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2006, 09:10:18 PM »

cheesy Once again this site has provided me with so many answers! I appreciate it! Thanks!
Do you bring to room temperature before stacking the supers if they come out of the freezer?
Thanks ! smiley
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2006, 09:51:53 PM »

Always bring anything you're putting into a hive to ambient (surrounding) temperature before inserting it.  Cold frames will kill bees, both unhatched brood and mature bees.
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atthelake22
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« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2007, 05:12:55 PM »

 Smiley Thank you so very very much!! I just can't wait for the season to begin. I stored all supers the way all recommended and sprayed with certan and got stored/stacked/ready for spring! Thank you guys so much, you don't know what a great help you have been to those of us just learning and trying so hard to not lose our girls through this weird winter!!
Sincere thanks!!
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