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Author Topic: Building Medium Boxes  (Read 2266 times)
Jeffrey Tooker
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Location: Paynes Creek Ca. USA


« on: August 11, 2006, 10:07:13 PM »

Today I resurected an old Wards table saw that I was going to put in the yardsale.  I built the jig from the email that Jay put up as a sticky on this forum.  The title is: "So You Want to Build A Box Joint".  It works very well.  I got everything set up and cut out a medium box.  It went together very well.  It took a couple of tries to get the dimensions just right.  My box is 1/16 narrow in both dimension.  It is close enough for me.  I will keep this box for a set of templates.  Tomorrow I will make a squareup and assembly jig.

I took Brian Brays advice and set up to make all of my boxes mediums.  It also uses up a lot of lumber that I have had for years.  It will be a lot easier to keep the lumber as unassembled boxes.  I will also have to build some bottoms and tops.  It will keep me busy.
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Jeffrey Tooker
Paynes Creek Ca.
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2006, 10:50:37 PM »

Congrats on the discovery.  Mediums are the easiest size to manufacture and use.  Every thing the same size solves problems and the scraps can be used to make shims, slatted racks, combining boards, etc.  A little judicious forethought can same a lot of money in cost.  I recycle any pine, fir, or cedar lumber into hive equipment whenever I have the chance.
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Jeffrey Tooker
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Location: Paynes Creek Ca. USA


« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2006, 11:30:44 PM »

[ A little judicious forethought can same a lot of money in cost.  I recycle any pine, fir, or cedar lumber into hive equipment whenever I have the chance.[/quote]

I will have to put cleats on the short sides of my mediums.  With the stock being 8/5" the rabbets dont leave much wood. If I put a full length cleat on each end it will beef it up.  I will be going to my neighbors tomorrow morning to fix his mill.  We may even cut some 1 X 7 rough.  I can make mediums out of it.  I have a trash can that all of my scrap goes into.  I think some of it can be used for parts for Hive equipment.  

When you get a chance I need to know what a "Slatted Rack" is, its uses and design.  I guess with mediums it takes seven to eight mediums per hive.  If so I need to build quite a few.

My friend who use to keep bees says that the honey that comes from the buck brush around here has a poor taste and is kind of red.  He suggests that it be kept for feeding the bees.  This brings up a question.  If one wants to save some of this poor honey to feed the bees in the winter, how is it done.  Also if one wants to pull out full honey frames an hold them to process later how is that done?

See I am full of questions.
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Jeffrey Tooker
Paynes Creek Ca.
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2006, 12:47:34 AM »

Slatted Rack

see photo at: www.betterbee.com/products.asp?dept=308
 
Better wintering and swarm control. A Slatted Rack is installed, as pictured, between the bottom board and the bottom brood chamber. In the winter, it keeps the brood chamber warmer so the queen can lay right to the bottom of the frame. In the spring and summer, when hive populations are at their largest, it provides a cluster space in the hive which can reduce swarming. Available for either 9 or 10 Frame Hives. Comes fully assembled. Dimensions: 20" x 16-3/8" x 2-1/4". (Ship Wt. 5 lbs.)

I would suggest you do away with the wide entrance guard on one end and replace the slats with 1 inch doweling.  It will function much better that way.

You need only 2 slatted racks per hive--one between the bottom board and lowest brood box and the other between the top brood box and the supers.  The upper rack replaces the queen excluder w/o inhibiting the bees or inducing swarming.  In fact, it actually helps to reduce swarming by presenting the bees with a guest room so to speak.

When feeding honey back to the bees add 1 pint of warm water to 1 pound of honey to make a syrup.  The warm water will dissolve any crystalization in the honey.  The warmth also seems to attract the bees but do not use hot--warm means tepid.  I find that taking hot water from the tap, mixing in the honey, putting on the lid and then taking it out to the hive results in enough cooling so that the bees go right to the syrup.  You should find that the bees will actually fly to the feeder while you're trying to install it.
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Jeffrey Tooker
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Location: Paynes Creek Ca. USA


« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2006, 05:56:14 PM »

<<<Slatted Rack.  I would suggest you do away with the wide entrance guard on one end and replace the slats with 1 inch doweling.  It will function much better that way.>>>

So you just end up with a rectangular frame with 1" dowels running lengthwise.  I will build mine.  I take it the inside dimension of the frame is the same as a medium box.  What is the minimum spacing between the 1" dowels? 1/4 to 3/8" bee space?

<<<You need only 2 slatted racks per hive--one between the bottom board and lowest brood box and the other between the top brood box and the supers.  >>>

I can see I will have plenty of winter projects for my wood shop.



<<<The upper rack replaces the queen excluder w/o inhibiting the bees or inducing swarming.>>>

If the slatted rack replaces the queen excluder, does it actually keep the queen out of the supers most of the time?

<<<When feeding honey back to the bees add 1 pint of warm water to 1 pound of honey to make a syrup.  The warm water will dissolve any crystalization in the honey. >>>

Is there some way to keep the honey in frames and just put it back as needed?
 
Well I fixed my neighbors sawmill.  My deal with him is that he will mill my 35' Ponderosa pine log.  I think I will take it in one by rough and as wide as it comes off of the log. I will have him cut 1" X 7" when he can.  With one square edge I can rip it to what I need.  The length will be 8'.  I will stack it and stick it and let it dry till next year.  It should be fine by then.
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Jeffrey Tooker
Paynes Creek Ca.
Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2006, 04:05:24 AM »

>>I take it the inside dimension of the frame is the same as a medium box. What is the minimum spacing between the 1" dowels? 1/4 to 3/8" bee space?

For dowel spacing a jig can be made that fits the inside demension by measuring in 1/2 inch from each end (this is the normal wiggle room within a longstroth hive) and then setting end bars side by side ( 10 for a 10 frame hive)  I'd use the wider portion and then mark the jig using the upper wire hole.  When done properly you will then have a quick way of spacing whenever alignment with frames is critical.

>>If the slatted rack replaces the queen excluder, does it actually keep the queen out of the supers most of the time?

Yes, it creates an "open" space the queen doesn't like to cross.  In using mediums and 3-4 are used for the brood chamber the queen will stay down.

>>Is there some way to keep the honey in frames and just put it back as needed?

Just keep it in the frame and feed the frames back to the hive as needed.  I had answered your question on the assumption that the honey had been extracted, which is the normal situation.
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Jeffrey Tooker
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Location: Paynes Creek Ca. USA


« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2006, 10:12:01 AM »

[quote="Brian D. Bray

<<<For dowel spacing a jig can be made that fits the inside demension by measuring in 1/2 inch from each end (this is the normal wiggle room within a longstroth hive) and then setting end bars side by side ( 10 for a 10 frame hive)  I'd use the wider portion and then mark the jig using the upper wire hole.  When done properly you will then have a quick way of spacing whenever alignment with frames is critical. >>>

I will make one in the next few weeks and send a picture.  We should be able to get it straight.




 <<< I had answered your question on the assumption that the honey had been extracted, which is the normal situation.[/quote]>>>

My error.
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Jeffrey Tooker
Paynes Creek Ca.
Jeffrey Tooker
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Posts: 19

Location: Paynes Creek Ca. USA


« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2006, 06:46:38 PM »

<<<
Quote from: Brian D. Bray
Slatted Rack

see photo at: www.betterbee.com/products.asp?dept=308
 

I would suggest you do away with the wide entrance guard on one end and replace the slats with 1 inch doweling.  It will function much better that way.>>>

Brian:

I have been thinking about building slatted racks.  I can make the frame and remove the entrance guard.  Now for the stingey part.  Instead of 1" dowel can I use .707" boards turned 45 degrees?  this would maintain spacing and look like a diamond.  Each rack would take about 16' of dowell.  Or would the square boards decrease the efficiency of the rack?
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Jeffrey Tooker
Paynes Creek Ca.
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
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Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


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« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2006, 10:29:10 PM »

Your midification should work well.  3/4 X 3/4 board as a diamond is about 1 inch point to point.
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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