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Author Topic: Late summer dearth  (Read 1453 times)
Zoot
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« on: August 10, 2006, 10:04:30 PM »

We have 2 hives that were started from packages on May 1st. After a spring and summer of ups and downs - mostly up for hive #1, a very strong hive now, mostly down for hive #2 which had to be re-queened back in June - both are now in good condition. Lots of bees, no mites yet.

But in each hive, literally every frame is filled with honey, pollen and some remaining brood. (I started with foundation only.) My question is: if I were to consider re-qeening (hive #2 yet again) or splitting (hive #1) what are the odds of stimulating further growth with no drawn comb on hand? I never did either in my former experience back in '79, '80. If there is a good late flow here will the bees in either case have enough resources (or inclination) to draw more comb in late august or sept?
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2006, 11:50:44 PM »

I believe you will experience at least one more honey flow before fall sets in to hard.  Here in the PNW we still have 1 for sure and maybe a 3rd.
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2006, 10:54:48 AM »

you should get a fall flow but if your weather has been dry it could hurt the flow, you will need to watch the hives and maybe feed them if they don't build up like you would like, fall feed I feed 2s to 1w.....
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kensfarm
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« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2006, 11:17:58 AM »

Hi Zoot..  I started my 2 hives from 5 frame nuks in the beginning of May too..  my equipment is new.. and I don't have drawn comb to put on the hives.  My thinking is.. if you don't put the foundation on the hive for them to work..  they def. won't..  and it can always be pulled off for winter hive setup.  I don't see that it would hurt.. especially if the hives are strong.  I always put a new Med. super on.. when they've worked up at least 8 of the ten frames on last Med. super installed..  the frames don't have to be full and capped.  Once they have the comb drawn.. it doesn't take them long to fill it.  Both hives will be getting their 5th Med. Super this weekend..  I've pulled almost 2 Med. Supers of honey off these hives.. and I replace the honey removed w/ foundation.  

I started a 3rd hive 2 weeks ago.. I bought the nuc from a beekeeper(30+ years) that lives about 5 miles down the road.  It ended up being an 8 frame nuc(it  was started in a Med. Super above another hive)  he makes sure the queen is a layer before he let's it go.  I just added a second Med. Super to it last weekend.. his advice was feed, feed, feed until the winter.  

When I returned his hardware from the transfer.. he asked if I had time for him to show me around his apairy.  He works in shorts & a short sleave shirt.. his bees were very calm.  He was checking out new queens to see how they were laying..  he also had a queen bank..  and pulled out a bank of queens to show me..  a first for me.  He also had a several 5 gallon buckets up in the trees for bait hives.  I asked if it was to catch his hives when they swarm..  he said since he replaces the queens often.. he doesn't get swarming.  He had a small BobCat pallet mover.. I asked if he used it for moving his hives..  he opened a nearby storage trailer that had barrels of honey in it..   WOW!  

I'm hoping for a good fall flow.. but we've been very dry in Maryland this summer.. hopefully some rain will come our way.
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tom
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« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2006, 09:20:50 PM »

Howdy

   I feel all of your pain it has been hot and dry here in southern VA and today it has rain only a little and the temp. is suppose to be kind of cool saturday. But i have seen my hives bringing in lots of pollen and my queens have started laying big time but i too have a hive i started from a 5 frame nuc and they are barely working compared to my other two hives and they still have three frames that they have not even touched so i too am hoping for a good fall flow.


Tom
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Zoot
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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2006, 10:12:11 PM »

One of the things I never gave much thought to prior to getting back into beekeeping is the CONSTANT importance of the weather. Ironically, this warm, dry weather we're having here now - such a pleasant change from the usual hideous, dripping swelter that typifies Maryland summers - is not at all beneficial for the bees obviously.

Kensfarm -
I'd like to get the name of this guy down the road from you. I seem to recall that you've made Bill Troup's aquaintance but it would be nice to hook up with someone a little closer. We're about 15 minutes southeast of Frederick, almost to Poolesville.
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tom
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« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2006, 11:29:07 PM »

Hello

   After reading i feel the same way but i am doing whatever it takes to keep my girls going and building up for the winter. It's been some years that i had bees but i missed them and seeing them in th fruit trees so now i am back into it and i am enjoying it like crazy and with the bees i have i can tell if they are not bringing in anything because my queens tell me by the amount of brood and now they are laying like crazy even my new queen she is out doing my other ones. So just keep and eye on them and if you think they need feeding then do so and if they have plenty of pollen and honey and seem to be working good then do not feed. What kind of bees do you have i have cordovan and carniolan  mixed and i pure NWC queen.  


Tom
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kensfarm
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« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2006, 09:37:30 AM »

Zoot.. I sent you an email w/ the information.  

The lack of rain has def. hurt..  farmers already started chopping corn for silage.  I have noticed all the pollen coming in too..  noticed nector curing in some open cells when I did a quick check this weekend.
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