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Author Topic: filtering \ straining honey ........  (Read 2995 times)
SteveSC
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« on: July 26, 2006, 08:21:36 AM »

I'll be extracting honey in a week or so ( first time ) and I'd like to filter strain the honey to be very clear and clean.

I want to use one of the double strainers mounted above to bucket ( not in the bucket ) and some good mesh cloth attached to the bucket for the final straining..  

Has anyone ever used the paint strainers that you put over a 5 gal. bucket....? No one seems to no the micron count on these strainers.

#68 and #100 are the type mesh cloth we can buy at bee supply stores - is that # the micron count...?

What is the best method for straining honey to the best clear condition...?

Steve SC
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ConfedMarine
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2006, 10:59:40 AM »

I have not used paint strainers in the past, but I use Dadants 600 micron strainer and it works great. If you buy a bottling bucket from Dadant's it will include a 200, 400, and a 600 filter. I live in Lynchburg, Va now, but I am orginally from Fountain Inn/Greenville. Good luck extracting.
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abejaruco
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2006, 11:20:11 AM »

I use a pair of nylon stocking. New, of course.
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SteveSC
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2006, 11:36:20 AM »

ConfedMarine....  I live a few miles outside Woodruff on 101 going toward Greer....I'm sure you know the area.  I'm from Greenville originally.  

I'll check out that Dadant bottling bucket....thanks.

************************************************************

I did think about the nylon stocking option - I'm sure it would work.  Thanks for the input..

SteveSC
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2006, 11:40:42 AM »

I used stocking before, but when I got the little system below it mad it a whole lot better, and these filters put out some very clean honey.... the way the filters fit together atlest get 2 of the filters, if you only get the 200 micron it will stop up, get all 3 or 2 of the (600-200), one will catch the bigger stuff and the other will catch smaller...... or go to a paint store and buy filters from them, 200 micron is the smallest I use...

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Scadsobees
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2006, 01:30:51 PM »

For my primary filtering I use is a 3 gallon bucket with holes drilled in the bottom and 2 paint strainers inside and a bucket lid with a hole cut in the top to hold the paint strainers up.  Nested inside a 5 gallong bucket with a gate.

This way I can dump almost 3 gallons in at a time and it is fast, then when done I dump the cappings in so they can drain also.

If more filtering is needed then I use the cheap 400 and 200 micron buckettop strainers from the bee stores.
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Rick
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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2006, 02:01:33 PM »

Quote from: Scadsobees
For my primary filtering I use is a 3 gallon bucket with holes drilled in the bottom and 2 paint strainers inside and a bucket lid with a hole cut in the top to hold the paint strainers up.  Nested inside a 5 gallong bucket with a gate.

This way I can dump almost 3 gallons in at a time and it is fast, then when done I dump the cappings in so they can drain also.




good idea Scad!!!!!! And Welcome to the Site!!!!!
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Apis629
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2006, 04:36:38 PM »

I usuall fix two layers of cheese cloth on the bucket and secure it to the bottling bucket with those 1-3 foot bungie courds with the little hooks on the ends.  If that isn't available, I use duck tape.
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BEE C
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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2006, 07:39:59 PM »

This year so far, ive used cooking strainers for wax particles/propolis and a very fine stainless steel mesh that I bought from a local beekeeping store.  The apiary I work at, (where I got the mesh) uses large filters over huge steel drums, where we pour honey three gallons at a time, later the honey is settled more in holding tanks with bottom screened taps.  (the wax particles float), then the honey is poured over another screen nylon, to get really clear honey.  I screened my honey to still have fragments of pollen and propolis suspended, with the smallest particles of wax.  "natural" or 'pure' honey is a big trend around here, where NO pasteurization or irridation is used.  The enzemes from honey that is not heat treated, and the natural fine filtered pollen/propolis grains are selling features to particular ethnic cultures.  The asian market is very knowledgeable about the health benefits of hive products and generally prefer and "raw" or "purer" type of honey.  I myself prefer the taste of raw honey, I find pasteurization kills the taste of the honey.  I finally found some orange blossom, and sage honey but it tasted burnt and so similar I was really disappointed.  To me pasteurizing or heating honey is like pickling something, all vinager, no taste.  Honey should be like a fine wine, distinct for the season its grown, and extracted with as much care as to better protect the essence of it.  I find it almost funny when people ask me if its pasteurized or in some way protected, like honey isn't a sterile and safe product.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2006, 02:18:07 AM »

The sterile healing properties of honey, it makes a very good oitment or salve.
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