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Author Topic: Wax Moth  (Read 2185 times)
alblbr
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Location: Albert, Ks


« on: July 14, 2006, 10:49:47 AM »

I have a question about the screened bottom boards. Today I removed the sticky board and found about a dozen moth larvae in various stages of development. This particular hive was a swarm I had captured about 5 weeks ago and it has one deep brood box that is fully drawn out. This morning I put another deep brood box with new foundation as the bees were bearding last night. The temps here in Kansas will be in the 100's for the next week. Will the bees be able to tolerate this amount of wax moth? What are the threshold levels to treat for the wax moth? [/list]
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wbanks
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« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2006, 02:05:10 PM »

alblbr,

Have you inspected the brood frames...can you tell how bad the moth infestion is? You may have to replace the infested frames or at lease scrape out  the sections that have larva and eggs.
I had quite a few frames that were infested this winter and I had to scrape all the wax off to re-use the frames...not sure what you can use to get rid of the wax larva while you have bee brood in with them and a new swarm may not have the numbers to fight off a bad infestion.

I would suggest that the next time you store wax frames (over winter) find a 0 degree freezer to store the frames in for at least 48 hours...this will kill any larva and destroy the eggs as well and the best part is your not using any chemicals!

will banks
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2006, 04:13:49 PM »

And if the storage site is not secure you might want to refreeze them in the spring so that any eggs laid in the wax during the winter won't hatch once they are on the hive and warm.  

A strong hive will police the wax moth on its own, a weak hive just doesn't have the man power to keep up and is eventually decimated.
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latebee
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2006, 10:27:47 PM »

If you don't like chemicals try using the BT bacteria sold under the brand name CERTAIN,I have had profound results using it. Before this I used to freeze the comb in a spare freezer-but I really prefer to spray the comb with CERTAIN it is so much more convient. If I have to store them afterwards I put the whole super(combs and all) in a contractor grade garbage bag tie it tight and have never had a problem in two years. Some of my mentors say they can remember a time when there were no wax moths to worry about, I wonder how long they have been around here in NY?
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qa33010
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2006, 11:16:21 PM »

Are they the same as the wax worms we use for bait?  If so I remember using them and mousies as a kid ice fishing in Minnesota.  That was back in the sixties and seventies, and two years ago when my kids got hooked on ice fishing also.   cheesy

Are they also the same moth/miller larvae that destroyed a lot of coats and we used moth balls on?

Fortunately I haven't had to get close and personal with them, other than when I dump them out of my moth trap.   evil

David
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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2006, 11:43:40 PM »

moth trap?
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talkhunting.com
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Peter


« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2006, 05:14:32 PM »

Quote from: qa33010


Fortunately I haven't had to get close and personal with them, other than when I dump them out of my moth trap.   evil

David


How is the trap constructed and employed? I have heard banana and vinegar is ment to work but not for me!
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