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Offline kathyp

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swarm catching ethics question
« on: June 19, 2006, 11:27:19 AM »
i have a friend with a commercial berry farm.  she hires a commercial bee keeper to bring 100's of  hives to her place.  twice she has had swarms that were in bad places and has called the bee keeper to let him know.  he's pretty busy, and doesn't seem to care about swarms.

last week, she had to burn one swarm that had moved into the irrigation pipes.  i told her to call me next time and i'd see if i could get the bees before they got into a bad place.

is there some "code of ethics" for catching other peoples bees?
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Offline Jerrymac

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swarm catching ethics question
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2006, 11:30:56 AM »
A swarm of bees, no matter where they came from, belongs to the person who's property they are on. The property owner can decide what to do with them.
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Offline Apis629

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swarm catching ethics question
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2006, 11:32:51 AM »
I'm not sure if there's a "code of ethics" but, there are a few laws.  Bees can't be removed from an active dwelling without ...I think it's a contractor's license and a building permit.  You'd have to check that one.  Also, if your not a licensed pesticide applicator you can't use any pesticide or soapy water to remove the bees.  These are the only rules I know of and, so far, I've obeyed them.

Offline Finsky

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swarm catching ethics question
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2006, 12:00:16 PM »
When you have foulbrood AFB, gasoline is poured on hives and put  fire after. What is the difference?

That is the law in many places.

Offline Jerrymac

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swarm catching ethics question
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2006, 12:14:33 PM »
Quote from: Apis629
I'm not sure if there's a "code of ethics" but, there are a few laws.  Bees can't be removed from an active dwelling without ...I think it's a contractor's license and a building permit.  You'd have to check that one.  Also, if your not a licensed pesticide applicator you can't use any pesticide or soapy water to remove the bees.  These are the only rules I know of and, so far, I've obeyed them.


It depends on what state you live in.
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Offline randydrivesabus

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swarm catching ethics question
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2006, 12:43:56 PM »
i would call the beekeeper and ask him how he feels about it. sounds like he doesnt care but i would check it out myself and not depend on the word of someone looking to get rid of the swarm the easiest way possible.

Offline Brian D. Bray

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swarm catching ethics question
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2006, 10:01:26 PM »
It actually depends on the State's Agricultural statutes which can in turn be added to my county (township in some states) and the individual city's ordances on pest control or atractive neusances.  So it all boils down to where you live.

In general a swarm is considered feral once it is free of the hive and can become the responsibility of the property owner where they alight.  If the swarm is located on public property it is generally first come first serve.
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