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Author Topic: Different Honey  (Read 1132 times)
Kris^
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« on: June 17, 2006, 12:40:58 AM »

We got some honey from the hives I placed in the squash field at the beginning of the month, a little over 50 lbs. of it.  It's not quite as sweet as the wildflower honey we've been getting at our home, and it has a little "zing" as an aftertaste.  Not unpleasant, though.  I noticed, too, that the cappings were thicker and yellower than our normal spring honey.  I figure that the bees didn't visit just the squash to get this honey, because there's only two acres of it, and there's lots of forage in the surrounding fields and forest.  But it adds a little twist to our regular spring offering.

And my neighbor's squash are doing great!  Cheesy

-- Kris
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Hi-Tech
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2006, 01:04:20 AM »

I only had 2 rows of squash in my garden this year but the bees were all over it! We will have a huge squash bounty this year!
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Summerbee
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2006, 04:05:49 PM »

I planted some squash in my veggie patch, it grew quite well, except near the end of the season when it got really sticky and humid.  Then the squash would have little green worms in it.  Not up until April; just from May on.  Nothing like slicing up some squash for dinner and watching it in the pan and thinking, "Hey. Wait a min... is this stuff moving?"

<...has a zing as an aftertaste. Not unpleasant though.>

I wonder if there is such thing as unpleasant honey?  I 've tried a lot of different kinds, they all taste good.  But I like palmetto honey the best.  Very dark and rich. Mmm.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2006, 07:55:12 PM »

I use to be a honey coniseweur (sic) but then I got some head injuries; now I can't smell or taste anything.  I've switched from enjoying foods for their taste to enjoying them for their texture.  I now enjoy things I use to hate and visa versa.  But I have never liked squash in either case--except zuccini--it makes a good sweet relish.
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Apis629
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« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2006, 12:18:09 AM »

Quote
I wonder if there is such thing as unpleasant honey?


"Smart-weed" tastes extreamly bitter.  And mountain laurel, although being of supposedly good taste, has an effect simmilar to narcodics and can be extreamly entoxicating/poisonous.  While only one of these truely tastes bad (and I can confirm this), I think mountain laurel more than makes up for it supposedly common flavor for the effect you would get from eating it.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2006, 09:15:57 AM »

I like smartweed honey.  But then I drink 16ox of esspresso on my way to work every morning, and I love dark chocolate, the darker the better, and I love horehound candy.  All bitter tastes that are quite addicting.
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Michael Bush
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Kris^
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« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2006, 11:01:53 AM »

Quote from: Summerbee

I wonder if there is such thing as unpleasant honey?  


I pulled some goldenrod honey (I think it was) last fall that was not pleasant.  Some of it tasted okay, but a couple frames didn't seem right.  Maybe it fermented or something, because I let it sit in the super for about a week before extracting it.  Anyhow, when I blended them together, the whole batch went weird.  It had a really "gamey" aftertaste and bite to it.  I ended up feeding it back to the bees.

The spring honey this year was excellent, smooth and full bodied, and it smelled like the Bidens we grew in the greenhouse.  Those were the bees' favorite flowers this year; they would attack each plant by the hundreds.  It was really good honey.

-- Kris
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