Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
July 23, 2014, 06:54:33 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cut comb question  (Read 1782 times)
Kris^
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 560


Location: Williamstown, NJ


« on: June 06, 2006, 09:07:22 PM »

I'll be pulling frames of cut comb in the next week or so.  Do you freeze the comb before or after you cut it from the frame?

-- Kris
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2006, 11:30:02 PM »

Why freeze it at all?  Cold makes honey sugar (granulate), just cut and wrap and enjoy the mess.  Think of it as an adult mudpie.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
qandle
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 19

Location: Orem, UT


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2006, 11:58:26 PM »

I think I remember reading somewhere that with one of the packaged comb systems -- Ross Rounds -- or something like that, there was some type of freezing as part of the process. Now I remember. Here it is:

"In most areas one additional step is necessary to protect the section from wax moth damage: the covered sections are placed in plastic bags, tightly sealed, and placed in a freezer at 10 degrees F or less (0 is best) for at least twenty-four hours. After freezing, the sections are allowed to come up to room temperature before opening the bag in order to avoid condensation on the sections. The sections may be left frozen indefinitely without crystallization, until removed for market."

Anyway...

Quint
Logged
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2006, 12:26:35 AM »

Well, I'll be a Monkey's Uncle.  Not having done Ross rounds (I gave up on combed honey production in the 60's) I've never heard of that.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Kris^
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 560


Location: Williamstown, NJ


« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2006, 07:12:44 AM »

I had not considered the possibility of condensation on the combs resulting from just putting the whole super into the freezer.  Thanks for the info!

Hope those containers get here soon . . .   Cheesy

-- Kris
Logged
amymcg
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 458


Location: Eastern Massachusetts


WWW
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2006, 07:12:44 AM »

I've also heard people say that it's easier to cut the cut comb if it's frozen, I guess that it won't make such a mess when cutting if you are actually cutting the comb, not using ross rounds.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13563


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2006, 11:45:16 PM »

>I'll be pulling frames of cut comb in the next week or so. Do you freeze the comb before or after you cut it from the frame?

I cut it and then freeze it.

>Why freeze it at all?

Wax worms.

> Cold makes honey sugar (granulate)

the 50's F will, but freezing will not, in fact it will stop it.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Kris^
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 560


Location: Williamstown, NJ


« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2006, 07:32:08 AM »

Quote from: Michael Bush
> Cold makes honey sugar (granulate)

the 50's F will, but freezing will not, in fact it will stop it.


This raises another questions, then.  I market my honey as "Raw Unfiltered", with all the natural enzymes intact.  Our customers seek it out for that reason.  I know that large producers heat their honey to prevent crystalization.  From what you're saying, freezing the honey will do the same thing and thus extend the shelf life.  Heating destroys the enzymes, though.  Do you know what effect freezing might have on the chemical properties of honey?

My initial thinking is the enzymes are preserved, else why do we need to blanche produce before freezing?  But my logic may be faulty.

-- Kris
Logged
Apis629
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 823


Location: Florida


WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2006, 11:40:03 AM »

If your concerned about the effects of freezing the comb, why not make a "chunk-comb" package.  Basicly, it's a peice of cut comb the width of the jar lid and almost the length of the jar and it's surrounded in honey.  I esspecially like these packages and they make a welcome treat on a warm scone.
Logged

Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13563


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2006, 02:36:10 PM »

>From what you're saying, freezing the honey will do the same thing

Not the SAME thing.   Once the processers have heated the honey it will set on the shelf for years without crystalizing.  Freezing it only postpones things until you thaw it.  In other words, if it would have crystalized in six months it will now crystalize six months after you take it out of the freezer.

>and thus extend the shelf life.

So the shelf life hasn't changed at all, but it's been postponed.

> Heating destroys the enzymes, though.

Yes it does.

> Do you know what effect freezing might have on the chemical properties of honey?

No it does not.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2006, 07:08:37 AM »

Even us old duffers learn something new now and then.  Thanks.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Kris^
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 560


Location: Williamstown, NJ


« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2006, 07:25:31 AM »

I understand now.  Thanks for the info.

-- Kris
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.215 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page June 29, 2014, 06:22:23 PM
anything