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Author Topic: migratory vs. telescoping  (Read 2250 times)
Rabbitdog
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« on: May 31, 2006, 12:42:20 PM »

This may sound stupid but ...........
What is the difference between these 2 types of covers and pros/cons.  I have seen pictures on MB's website and the migratory cover appears to be just a telescoping cover w/o the front and back drop pieces???

Thanks
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Understudy
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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2006, 07:50:01 PM »

Telescoping covers work with inner covers. There is a gap of space above the  inner cover and the underside of the telescoping cover. This acts like attic space and is suppose to create an insulating layer of air.  You would generally place a rock or heavy item to prevent a telescoping cover from blowing off in high winds.  Telescoping covers use the inner cover to prevent propilis lockdown. The telescoping cover doesn't have any good leverage points for a prybar. So the inner cover is also there to take the propilis because it can be pried up more easily.

Migratory covers are just that designed for migrating beehives. These are used by snowbird beekeepers and others when moving bees. It is basically a flat cover that screws or nails down to the box. No rock or heavy object needed. However no insulating layer and it can turn a hive into a hot box if not watched properly.

Some beekeepers use them instead of telescoping covers because of their simplicity. Also because it is simplier to stock one type of cover than two which can also be expensive.


Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2006, 09:39:22 PM »

Telescopic covers with inner covers are popular in the North.  The double ceiling with an air space helps with condsation.  The migratory cover has caught on more in the south.  It's simpler, cheaper and condensation doesn't seem to be a problem there.

I prop mine open to make a top entrance and I put some styrofoam on top for the winter.  This seems to deal with condensation well.

A simple migratory cover in the North may have an ice ball on the lid that will melt and drip on the cluster.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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Rabbitdog
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« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2006, 04:47:17 PM »

Thanks for the description.  However, one more question please.....  
I like being able to provide extra ventilation.  We can see upper 90s and maybe 100+ for a day or two in this part of VA in August.  If you use a migratory cover and prop it open with shims for a top entrance, won't the bees put burr comb all over the top of the frames in the upper most super?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2006, 07:58:41 PM »

Sometimes they burr a perfectly good inner cover too.  But I use shingle shims.  They are about 1/4" to 3/8" at one end and nothing at the other.  If the boxes are typical there is only 1/4" space at the top which makes it 1/4" at one end and 1/2 at the other end.  The 1/2" end is the entrance and the won't burr the entrance.
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Michael Bush
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Apis629
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« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2006, 10:31:28 AM »

I use the "migratory covers", although, we usually call them "covers" or "flat tops".  They have advanteges here of being easier to remove, not allowing a place for SHB to hide and reproduce, not allowing a place for "Bull ants" to nest and, of cource, being cheap.  In the winter they will sometimes get a little condensation, but, that's easily fixed by proping up one side about 1/8 inch or so with a nearby twig.  As for winds, the bees (if you have a stong colony) will propolise it down in about a day or two.  The hives go through hurricanes just fine without a lid flying off.  Granted, those were all some distance away and winds were only around 40 miles per hour.
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Anonymous
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2006, 01:04:08 PM »

Our migratory lids are the same shape as telescopic but sit flush with the super. I have used telescopic, but our bees here in South Africa seem to like to propolize the hell out of them and they don't last long when trying to open.
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