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Author Topic: lupins  (Read 1736 times)

Offline beemad

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lupins
« on: May 28, 2006, 05:31:37 PM »
hi all has anyone put bees on lupins ?? do they get much nectar from lupins ?? and what is the honey (if any ) like ??
many thanks simon

Offline SherryL

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lupins
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2006, 06:10:48 PM »
In the states we call them lupines.  They will be blooming up by my bees in a few weeks.  Lupines are listed as a nectar and pollen source, but I've never seen any bees on the ones near my hives.  Sorry, can't offer any info other than that.

Offline BEE C

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lupins
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2006, 05:49:23 AM »
up here lupines are a good forage source.  Related to beans.  I ve started beds of them from seed, hoping to get some pics, but arn't blooming yet.

Offline beemad

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lupins
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2006, 05:56:44 AM »
thanks for your replies i will give them a try . regards simon

Offline Finsky

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lupins
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2006, 05:59:02 AM »
Lupines are not bee's favorit. If you look for lupine honey, you will not find that product.

Offline BEE C

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lupins
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2006, 08:31:53 AM »
Deer don't eat lupines, deer mow my lawn, lupines are a member of the pea family and related to Broom bushes another widespread wildflower in my area.  
Quote
Lupines are not bee's favorit. If you look for lupine honey, you will not find that product.

True, but lupine is still a flower buzzing with bees while in bloom.  My apiary is forest  with poppies, bee balm, wisteria, gladiolas, blueberries, butterfly bush, echineasia, sunflowers, cherries, strawberries, lupines, lavender, salvia, clematis, honeysuckle, hops, dogwood...there is no way to guarantee any honey is single forage crop unless that was the only crop for at least eight miles.  Not even in the worst mass planting of berry crops is this the case.  Single forage crop honey in Canada has to bee at least 5o percent single forage to be labelled as such.  That being said, I do agree that lupines are probably not a plentiful source of nectar because they grow so scattered as most wildflowers do.  I'm a fan of any perennials that spread and need little care.

Offline Finsky

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lupins
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2006, 09:51:55 AM »
Quote from: BEE C
.  I'm a fan of any perennials that spread and need little care.


I have brick red lupines in my garden too. A good plant is perennila dark mullein Verbascum nigrum . They just get pollen but it is nice to look bees. In the morinig there are several bees in same plant. This plant is crossing between Finnish and Jugoslavian plant.

The same original plant from Jugoslavia has been in garden 22 years.



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Offline BEE C

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lupins
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2006, 03:55:26 AM »
I love to garden...I don't suppose this plant produces seed?  I am a bit of a gardening nut, and love to keep rare plants....

 

anything