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Author Topic: Big Problem with Queen Cells  (Read 4442 times)
drgenegarris
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« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2006, 02:10:10 PM »

Quote from: Brian D. Bray
Meanwhile back at the ranch the supercedure cells were probably moved to a hive without a queen from a hive that was in the process or replacing one.  therby moving the queenless situation of one hive to the other.  The bees will sometimes kill the existing queen after the supercedure cells are capped so insure the old queen is replaced by the new queen.


If queenless colony (1) got the frame with brood and supercedure cells and queenless colony (2) got a purchased queen how is that a problem?
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Finsky
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« Reply #21 on: June 06, 2006, 02:27:29 PM »

I did not get what is your situation now.

You got two queens. Did you make third colony or where you put 2 queens and queen cells?
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drgenegarris
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« Reply #22 on: June 06, 2006, 02:35:40 PM »

Quote from: Finsky
I did not get what is your situation now.

You got two queens. Did you make third colony or where you put 2 queens and queen cells?


When I inspected the hives I saw that the previously queenless hive H1, to which I transferred a frame of brood and supercedure cells, had eggs.  H2 had neither eggs nor supercedure cells.  I had previously purchased two queens.  

I removed the brood frame from H1 and took stores and pollen from H2 to form a nuc (H3).  I then installed new queens, in cages, in H2 and H3.

Sorry for the confusion.   This was done on Saturday.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #23 on: June 06, 2006, 06:01:29 PM »

And The doctor said: "The patients seem well on the road to recovery all that was needed was a queen in every hive."
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
Zoot
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« Reply #24 on: June 06, 2006, 11:14:39 PM »

Just a quick observation on the relationship between honey flows and feeding syrup - in this part of Maryland the strongest flow is traditionally that of the tulip poplar and honey locust in May. Also it's usually the longest. But if we have periods of heavy rain (sometimes helpful in other flows) the nectar from the tulip polar blossoms is mostly washed out and the honey production suffers accordingly. Additionally, due to the loss of cropland, over-developement and other factors (less clover, alfalfa, etc) many parts of our county don't really see another significant flow after that, even in the fall so many beekeepers feed syrup and even pollen substitute from midsummer on which kind of mystifies me (as in why bother keeping bees then). I've always assumed that honeybees can obtain sufficient food stores (for their survival at least) from just about any environment.
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