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Author Topic: Top Bar Hive Made from Old Wood  (Read 3333 times)
Piper
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« on: May 18, 2006, 10:47:53 PM »

We just built our TBH using old barn wood.  It's weathered, but thick and sturdy. Do you forsee any problems using old wood? Daughter wants to paint outside of hive.. should I do anything to help treat the inside of the hive at all?  Should I steer clear of sealant due to chemicals?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2006, 12:12:40 AM »

>We just built our TBH using old barn wood. It's weathered, but thick and sturdy. Do you forsee any problems using old wood?

If it was up four feet or so on the barn wall, no.  If it was the bottom four feet, it may smell like urine.

> Daughter wants to paint outside of hive.. should I do anything to help treat the inside of the hive at all?

Absolutely not.

> Should I steer clear of sealant due to chemicals?

The outside is up to you.  The inside is up to the bees.  I don't paint mine anymore.  Smiley  I got lazy:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslazy.htm
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Piper
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« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2006, 09:17:16 AM »

I think we're going to be okay as far as the smell thank goodness!  The wood actually came from more of a chicken-coop shed-type building which hasn't seen the likes of a chicken for 40 years or more.  I'm sure the bees will be relieved on that one!  cheesy   Thanks for the advice,  I figured I'd better leave the inside alone.  I'd actually not paint outside either, but daughter has big plans for that.  Just hope it doesn't involve pink.  Cool
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Apis629
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« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2006, 12:45:04 PM »

If you're concerned about the wood having been weathered, you can treat the wood with COPERTOX.  It's sold at most marine supply stores and treats wood for protection against wood boring insects, mold, mildew and dry rot.  A well treated hive will have boxes lasting 40 years or more.  I myself prefer the pre-mixed variety with "petrolium distilates".  If you buy the concentrated version, mix it with 1:1 desil fuel.  Dadant also sells it.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2006, 11:48:33 PM »

I'm sure the bees will love the smell of diesil.  Wink
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Apis629
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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2006, 12:07:01 AM »

That's why I prefer the petrolium distilates...they don't smell AS bad.  That's not to say they smell good, however.  I just let it air out like I would with PDB (with the frames out of the box, ofcource) and after a day or two the smell disappears.  I've not had any bad effects in my hives and, the practice iteslf was recomended to me by the commercial guys, so it can't be all bad.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2006, 11:48:39 AM »

>I just let it air out like I would with PDB (with the frames out of the box, ofcource) and after a day or two the smell disappears.

That's why I don't use PDB either.

> I've not had any bad effects in my hives and, the practice iteslf was recomended to me by the commercial guys, so it can't be all bad.

Sure it can.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Apis629
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« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2006, 05:11:55 PM »

With the high hummidity of this climate, wood rots extreamly quickly.  Termites, carpender ants, fungus and other wood boaring insects are common.  I'm just trying to extend the life of my woodenware.  It isn't used on the frames, foundation; just the boxes, BBs and covers.  

As for the PDB, you have the luxury of not having to use it, I imagine, given you have a WINTER.  The coldest temperature down here is around 37 degrees and only for a night or two.  After that it's usually up in the 40s to 60s.
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Summerbee
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« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2006, 07:48:27 PM »

I have been painting/dipping my supers, covers, bbs with a 2% copper sulfate solution from home depot.  Dadants had it for sale but I found it much cheaper at home depot, lowe's, etc.  Seems to keep SHB, wax moths, rot, everything off.  And I think it's the only chemical of that kind to be approved by the EPA.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2006, 09:19:07 PM »

>As for the PDB, you have the luxury of not having to use it

I have the luxury of Certan:

http://www.beeworks.com/uscatalog/details/certan.asp
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Apis629
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« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2006, 09:39:55 PM »

I have doubts in Certan's ability to keep down SHB.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2006, 09:18:06 AM »

I would too.  I know nothing about dealing with SHB at this point other than the sketchy reports that are currently out there.  But I still don't want PDB in my honey comb.  I'll go to all comb honey before I go to that.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Hi-Tech
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« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2006, 10:07:40 AM »

After making rounds with a beek last week helping him work his 60 hives, I got a good look at SHB and what they can do. That is THE number one threat here. Most of the beeks here dont even talk much about the mites because the SHB are so bad. I saw several hive completely crawling with SHB maggots. It was disgusting! Until I made that trip with him, I had only read about SHB and most people talked about seeing one here and there. We saw hives with what I thought to be hundreds or thousands! That is why the local beeks say to never tie in comb from a feral hive.. It will be eat up with SHB.

Anyway, I said that to say this... If using PDB helps, it could be the difference between having some honey tainted with PDB or having honey tainted with SHB maggots. They are THAT bad here.... I have not used PDB but I may have to start...
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2006, 02:18:42 PM »

If you do all cut comb you will have no comb to store.  You can't put PDB on a hive, it will kill the bees.  You can't eat PDB it will give you cancer.  I don't want that in my hive.

I wonder how dry supers would be infested?  Seems like the SHB is looking for honey.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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