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Author Topic: Great website!  (Read 1936 times)
NaeMO
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« on: May 14, 2006, 11:49:47 PM »

My husband and I have been reading a LOT here, and we're doing our best with what we have.

The whole "bee thing" just fell into our lap.  About 3 weeks ago a huge swarm showed up and nested in one of our shrubs.  Dh called a local man (former beekeeper) and he came and got them.

Then another swarm showed up.  Then another.  Mr. Former Beekeeper then gives us hive building plans.  See where this is heading?   cheesy

So dh builds a nuc box - but FAST - no frames, just top bars.  While he's building it, a 3rd swarm shows up, then the two that were there take off.  The nerve! Ha! (In the past 3-4 weeks we've had 6 swarms come through)

So the nuc box isn't ready until the following day, and the peach tree swarm is still there, so dh dons a borrowed bee suit and gets the bees.  We think we got the queen.  


As of today, we've had them for 6 days.  My oldest son (14) wanted to check the bees yesterday, so I let him.  He did a great job, but it's hard relaying back and forth what he should be looking for.  Unfortunately, the bees are drawing comb crosswise!  I did my best to make a "guide" of sorts on such short notice.  I bought square cut comb honey and cut it into strips and tied it onto the bars.  Well, they've attached it a little and cleaned it out, but went and built elsewhere.  THey showed me!

Dh is going to build a full 10 frame box (all medium depth for uniformity, though, thanks Michael Bush!) and I guess a wired brood frame, since we're going to have to treat this like a swarm catcher unless I learn otherwise (very possible!).  

We're a homeschooling family, and I think this is a great learning experience for all of us.  We're trying to plan a bee-licious flower garden for our new friends, too.

I really appreciate the forum, have learned so much already!

Renae in MO
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Bumbling our way through beginning beekeeping!
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2006, 11:55:06 PM »

Welcome!

A lot of us are new to this also and have found this to be a great place to learn. People like MB, as you have already found out, probably have forgotten more than I will learn. These guys and gals are the best!

Good luck and have fun!
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NaeMO
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2006, 12:11:21 AM »

Thanks!  I see you keep chickens also!  We started our small flock of laying hens  last year, but we live in town.  It's a small rural town, so no ordinances against it. Smiley

Last year chickens, this year bees...  What will we add next year?  Mini goats?  cheesy
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2006, 12:16:26 AM »

That sounds like me. The bees are quickly becoming the favorite though...

They don't carry a fatal flu virus and never ever bust down a fence and eat the neighbors garden.... wink
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2006, 06:26:20 AM »

NaeMO:

Just wanted to welcome you and say HI back!!! Glad you found the forum, it is more than obvious you have a natural magnetism to honeybees. I think it is a great time in your lives (your son will get so much out of it) the more time you put into learning about these fascinating creatures and their instinctual ways. the more you will want to know.

Best wishes and have fun!!!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2006, 06:56:16 AM »

>and I guess a wired brood frame, since we're going to have to treat this like a swarm catcher unless I learn otherwise (very possible!).

I would consider it a cut out.  I'm not sure what you mean by "a wired brood frame" exactly in this context.  Typically that term would refer to a comb with wired wax foundation in it.  If you just cut the combs out and cut them to fit in an empty frame (skip the honey, new honey combs are way too fragile and heavy) and tie them or rubber band them in this will work.  Or you can make the swarm catcing frames in the plans section on www.beesource.com.  The swarm catching frames are worth building, but if you don't have them I wouldn't let that stop you from doing cutouts.  Langstroth started his hives (back in the 1800s) by doing cutouts as did Huber (back in the 1700s) before him.  Smiley
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
NaeMO
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2006, 12:44:05 PM »

Quote from: Michael Bush

  Or you can make the swarm catcing frames in the plans section on www.beesource.com.  The swarm catching frames are worth building, but if you don't have them I wouldn't let that stop you from doing cutouts.  Langstroth started his hives (back in the 1800s) by doing cutouts as did Huber (back in the 1700s) before him.  Smiley


Thank you for your reply!  I see I need to work on the terminology. embarassed  Yes, a swarm catcher frame. Wires on the outside.  I printed out the plans for my husband. I probably found the link from your site!  How long should we wait to do the cutouts?  Or rather, when is too soon and is it ever too late?  

If there is honey comb, can I let my kids have it, or should we just toss it?  We haven't treated the bees with anything.  

And thanks, Beemaster, for the warm welcome and putting in the time for this site!  I am grateful.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2006, 10:57:02 PM »

Anytime between April and August is a pretty good time to do a cutout.  Any later and they may not get established enough to get through the winter.  Sooner is better.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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