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Author Topic: Sick Bee Photo?  (Read 2171 times)
Scott Derrick
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« on: May 10, 2006, 02:49:47 PM »

Hi Everyone,

Took some photos from a few hives today and need some input. Please check out this bee. The photo isn't extreamly clear but you will get the idea. Is this just old age? I saw two or three of them. I don't think it is a new born bee. Your thoughts are appreciated.

http://www.midstatebeekeepers.com/hive_photos/sick_bee.JPG

Scott Derrick
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ctsoth
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2006, 02:51:41 PM »

I'm thinking its probably a drifter.
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2006, 03:54:27 PM »

I agree, that bee isn't from that hive - probably adopted through persistent attempts to bypass security at the hive entrance. And don't forget, workers who are (I like the term drifter) typically do pick up on hive duties and become functional - honeybees of course... They can't help it, it's in their nature.
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2006, 08:55:35 PM »

I can almost  say for certain, you may have deformed wing virus. (DWV)
I had it in one of my hives, 2 years in a row. Look around outside the hive and see if you have any more walking around.  If you have seen more than one in the hive, you may have some problems. Both of my hives died out. Some scientists say it lives in the comb and is helped along by the mites. I have seen DWV on both workers and drones.
I respectfully have to disagree that those are old bees or drifters.
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Scott Derrick
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2006, 09:02:15 PM »

I would appreciate as much input as possible on this. How did you treat this problem. Did you just get rid of the frames?

Scott
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2006, 09:06:01 PM »

I agree with newbee101.  It is a new born bee (white hairs) with DWV.  You need to keep an eye on the hive and monitor the varroa level.
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Scott Derrick
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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2006, 09:10:12 PM »

I truly haven't seen any varroa on them at all. I have been looking carefully. You can see by the photos also. I have been feeding them with 1 to 1 syrup with honey b healthy which I understand helps to keep varroa at bay when used at 3.5 teaspoons per 1.5 qts of syrup. I have been using this on all 4 of my hives and so far it has helped keep it away. I have been taking a bunch of photos of my bees and looking for varroa. I just haven't seen any. I have seen some small hive beetles but not too many of those.
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2006, 09:10:50 PM »

I got rid of all the old dark comb and reused the hive again this year.
I did not get rid of the really clean comb or the capped honey. Maybe I should have. Just beacuse I lost my hives, doesnt mean your going to lose yours. Keep an eye on the mite counts. Check some drone comb.
Bee- L had some interesting stuff on DWV.
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2006, 09:14:53 PM »

Your not going to find many mites by looking on their backs. You need to use a screened bottom board to monitor the counts. As for honey bee healthy preventing varroa, you got some wrong info.
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2006, 09:17:25 PM »

As newbee says, rip open a bunch of capped drone cells and inspect the larvae for mites.

Also look for others with DWV.  I have had hives that I occasionally found a couple here and there and they survived fine.  I would start getting concerned when you start seeing a lot with it.
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2006, 09:48:44 PM »

I missed the deformation, I was thinking I saw the wings on a head-one angle - but I still would have missed this one. This is why I'm NOT the answer guy - it still looks like a different bread, surely grayish in color, but I guess that comes with the sickness.

Glad we have such astute members, I'm always proud of you guys/gals - bravo.

PS... Although the news isn't good - at least it sounds like you have an idea what to do and attack the problem. It is always better to know then to not know, no matter what the answer is - good luck!!!
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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2006, 10:27:00 PM »

I have to agree.  Deformed Wing Virus.  These are off new packages?  I would keep a very close eye on them.  They will probably outbrood the vorroa this summer, but begin to seem listliss in late summer, then dwindle and crash in the fall if you don't take some action.
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Scott Derrick
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« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2006, 10:42:37 PM »

Thanks for all the replys. Here is another picture of that same bee. This one might bee a little better. I think you are correct about the DWV. So should I pull all the frames now or wait until the queen emerges. This hive is the one with the queen cell that I posted the photos of earlier. This is a difficult one.

http://www.midstatebeekeepers.com/hive_photos/sick_bee_2.JPG

I'll consider any advise you guys can give on what I should do right now.

Scott
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« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2006, 01:39:00 AM »

If you see some don't worry. You have varroa even you do not see them. It is good because they are few.

When you have good varroa load you will se mites on new born bees. They under abdomen, on back, on waist  etc.

If you have tens or hundreds deformed wings on frame in same time, then your mitelevel is bad. Use small drone comb areas to catch mites.
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