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Author Topic: OK, so I just installed my bees about half an hour ago..  (Read 1277 times)
yvette97206
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Location: Sandy, Oregon at the base of the Mt. Hood foot hills


« on: May 04, 2006, 11:51:45 PM »

They came in early!  That was both great, and scary.  I did get to get off work early, so that was great; I didn't have to wait until Monday and do it in the rain (yay!!) and today was gorgeous; but I realized on the way home with the package in my trunk, that I have a question.

And then after I installed them (well, during) I had another question.

First, the hive that I decided to use is already almost full of drawn comb - don't worry, I won the complete hive in a raffle at the Oregon Beekeeper's Association - so, how long until I will need the second box/deep super?  I have them installed in a Western bottom.  I got to thinking that they will probably fill it much quicker than a month because it is already full of comb?  I planned on getting the next box in a week or so and planned on putting it on within 30 days.  

So, after I had doused them in syrup, I took out the queen cage (her beautiful blonde Majesty!) and began shaking them into the space I made by removing five frames.  They ended up in a pile on the bottom of the hive.  I was trying to do this as quickly as possible, but it took forever to move them out of the way, and I have to say, I feel like I squished alot.  I finally ended up putting the lid on the hive (queen cage inside) and let them disperse.  But then I was worried about smothering.  So I opened up the hive again and put in the last two frames.  They had moved some, and I was able to brush them aside enough to feel like less got squished.  So, the question I have about this is, OMG, did I screw up somehow?  I stood there and watched them for a while and they seemed to be moving in and out and orientating themselves to their home.  They looked happy and I had stuffed some grass in the entrance and they were maneuvering around it nicely.  Finished up around seven 45.

Still need to release the queen.  Will do so tomorrow...should I do it in the morning before work, or wait until evening when I get home around five?  Also, if there are no other bees around my house, how will my queen mate with drones on her maiden flight?  Allright, I had a few more questions than I thought, but any help would be much appreciated:)

Y
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BEE C
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« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2006, 01:10:36 AM »

Sounds like everything went well!  I felt like a murderer too...I find I kill less bees when i smoke them out of the way, they seem to be mad about the brush when I use it.  Way more bees move when smoked than brushed.  I would release the queen in the eve when its cool, as she is much less likely to buzz off.  Did you use a package or?? if so the queen should be a mated laying queen.  So no worries.  If not, there should still be drones around, look up way up thats where the nasty will be taking place...Good luck!
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2006, 07:16:42 AM »

>I got to thinking that they will probably fill it much quicker than a month because it is already full of comb?

They will fill it more quickly, yes, but it will take a while for them to fully occupy a ten frame deep.  Still, I would always try to have the next box on hand and assmebled so you can use it when you need it.

> I planned on getting the next box in a week or so and planned on putting it on within 30 days.

I would get it.  I woulnd't plan on when to put it on.  Let the bees decide.  They may not even outgrow the deep this year, or they may fill three of them.

>They had moved some, and I was able to brush them aside enough to feel like less got squished. So, the question I have about this is, OMG, did I screw up somehow?

How?  Sounds fine to me.

>Still need to release the queen. Will do so tomorrow...should I do it in the morning before work, or wait until evening when I get home around five?

I would have done it when you put them in.  Either is fine.

> Also, if there are no other bees around my house, how will my queen mate with drones on her maiden flight?

First, the queen in a package is already mated.

Second, she will fly as much as eight miles to mate.

Third, I'll bet there are bees around your house, you just haven't noticed them.

>they seem to be mad about the brush when I use it.

The secret to using a brush is to NOT be gentle.  You FLICK with the brush, you don't brush gently or you will roll them and make them VERY angry.  When you flick you surprise them and knock them right off.  When you brush gently, they just hold on tighter.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
yvette97206
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Location: Sandy, Oregon at the base of the Mt. Hood foot hills


« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2006, 12:54:05 AM »

Thanks so much!  So, I got up this morning and read these posts.  I decided to go in to work late, and oh! what a glorious morning it was!  Sunny and warm.  At around seven, I went outside...no activity, although the sun was shining right on the entrance.  I took off the grass I had placed in front last night, but still no activity.  there were about six bees still on top of the box they had come in, I couldn't quite get all of them out.  They were alive and lucky it was not cold last night as they were still alive.  I fed horses and ducks and made a pot of coffee.  Sat on my hands for about an hour and a half.  Got my suit on, set off for my bee yard and oh yay! lots of flying around. cheesy

I opened up the hive cover and took out the queen cage.  It was covered in bees and I could see them very clearly feeding her with their long tongues.  I couldn't get the cork out, it was a terrible design.  An oblong piece of cork stuffed into that round hole.  I finally ended up pushing it in, on accident.  Well, since it was in there I very gently maneuvered her around the cork, quickly pushed her cage back in the frames, and waited.  So many bees were surrounding her, it was hard to see much.   When I picked up the cage, she was gone, down inside the hive.  I expected them to love the queen, but wow, did they love her alot!

Still seemed to squish alot.  At least four or five each time I have been out there.  Not to mention the ones I don't want to think about last night rolling around under the frames.

The coolest thing of the whole experience was the bees themselves.  Not only were they very pretty light colored bees, but they were so friendly!  My son and my husband, who are both fascinated but terrified, stood within ten feet of the hive during the whole installation process.  He commented how much friendlier they were than he expected.  But the part I loved most was that before I could even get the hive closed up for the night, those worker bees were right in those combs, cleaning away.  Amazing.  And then again this morning, when I was out there at seven, I did stay for the very first emergence this morning.  First bee out, straight out, up, and over my head.  Second shortly after, straight up and right behind the hive she goes, on a mission.  My husband says "Scouts".  That's exactly what it looked like.  So cool.  So I watched the first five or six, then I was off for coffee.

So, how long should I wait to open the hive?  The beeks at the bee day I went to this spring did theirs about three days after, but they released theirs by candy cork/bees eating it to release.  I just put mine right in.    I really appreciate your responses, guys.  At work today, unable to control my excitement over my mornings activities, I was officially known as the youngest "dork" in the office.  City folk...don't know what they're missin. Cheesy
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2006, 06:23:00 PM »

Next time, just pull the staples and let her out by removing the screen.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Apis629
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2006, 11:33:32 PM »

Quote
City folk...don't know what they're missin.


What qualifies as "City folk"? Second, here's a mildly interesting story.  Here in Pinellas co. FL, the "City" is the only place bees can be kept.  They've actually passed a county ordinance banning bees in the undeveloped communities.  That ordinance didn't pass for the city government (thank god!).
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yvette97206
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Location: Sandy, Oregon at the base of the Mt. Hood foot hills


« Reply #6 on: May 08, 2006, 01:10:08 PM »

I don't think there is a city ordinance, but there are really no bees in the city of Portland.  There are several rural areas outside in all directions and there are lots off bees in the outskirts.  I am way out in the country, and even out here, lots of folks are wary of bees.
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