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Author Topic: New beekeeper has questions  (Read 1155 times)
DerekSLC
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Location: Salt Lake City, UT


« on: May 01, 2006, 10:52:13 AM »

I am new to beekeeping and have a few questions about feeding.
I put the bees in the hive 2 days ago and am using a frame feeder. I have been reading recently about all the disadvantages to this type of feeder and am considering switching to a hive top feeder.

My question is: Should I just go with the frame feeder for now or switch to another type, such as the hive top?  Is it a bad time to switch?  I don't like opening the hive so much to check levels and refill.  

Also, for a new hive how long should I feed them for?  I live in Salt Lake City, UT and the daytime temps are nearing 70 degrees.

My last question: I have the inner cover on top of the lower brood chamber and then the outer cover on top of that. Do I cover the hole on top of the inner cover?  I have that plastic one way escape cover.

Believe it or not I do have the beekeeping for dummies book and have been reading it but still have questions.  Does that make me more or less of a dummie?  Any help would be appreciated.
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thomashton
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Location: College Ward, Utah


« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2006, 11:27:12 AM »

Quote from: DerekSLC
I am new to beekeeping and have a few questions about feeding.
I put the bees in the hive 2 days ago and am using a frame feeder. I have been reading recently about all the disadvantages to this type of feeder and am considering switching to a hive top feeder.

My question is: Should I just go with the frame feeder for now or switch to another type, such as the hive top?  Is it a bad time to switch?  I don't like opening the hive so much to check levels and refill.  

Also, for a new hive how long should I feed them for?  I live in Salt Lake City, UT and the daytime temps are nearing 70 degrees.

My last question: I have the inner cover on top of the lower brood chamber and then the outer cover on top of that. Do I cover the hole on top of the inner cover?  I have that plastic one way escape cover.

Believe it or not I do have the beekeeping for dummies book and have been reading it but still have questions.  Does that make me more or less of a dummie?  Any help would be appreciated.


Welcome to the forum! There are a couple other Utah beekeepers here. I am from Cache County, and golfpsycho is from the Salt Lake area as well there in Canyon Rim just south of I-80.

1) Would recommend replacing your feeder. You use up frame space and the capacity is small leaving you to have to refill it often. Also, if the design is bad, you will get a bit of drowned bees. A lot of beekeepers here will probably disagree with me, but I like the big plastic hive top feeder from Better Bee (http://www.betterbee.com/products.asp?dept=1709). You don't have to open the whole hive to fill it and it holds 2 gallons.

2) Our daytime temps are also in the high 60s low 70s, but the honey flow hasn't started. Nearly nothing but dandilons have blossomed. Also, I have two new packages that need the syrup to build comb fast. They are doing a great job too being fed as much as they are. One hive has drawn out 2 full medium hive bodies in 18 days and now have their 3rd box to begin on. Feed until the flow begins and then they can take care of themselves. Until then, feed, feed, feed to get them to build comb and feed the brood.

3) No, you're not a Dummy. I have read it twice as well as Starting Right with Bees, Keeping Bees and several others, but still have a million questions. That is why I and everyone else is here. If you think you will ever know everything there is to know about this hobby, it's time for you to find a new one where that is actually possible.

Again, WELCOME!
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After 18 months of reading and preparation, my girls finally arrived on April 11th (2006)!
Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2006, 01:45:22 PM »

>I am new to beekeeping and have a few questions about feeding.
I put the bees in the hive 2 days ago and am using a frame feeder. I have been reading recently about all the disadvantages to this type of feeder and am considering switching to a hive top feeder.

I dislike all feeders.  You'll just trade one se of problems for another.

>Also, for a new hive how long should I feed them for? I live in Salt Lake City, UT and the daytime temps are nearing 70 degrees.

If there are things blooming, don't worry about it.

>My last question: I have the inner cover on top of the lower brood chamber and then the outer cover on top of that. Do I cover the hole on top of the inner cover?

No.

> I have that plastic one way escape cover.

Throw it away now.  If you put it on the bees will get stuck above the escape.  If you use the escape bees will get stuck in the escape.  Buy a triangular bee escape from Brushy Mt, if you want a bee escape.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
thegolfpsycho
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Location: canyon rim, ut


« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2006, 03:12:28 PM »

Russian Olive has just started to bloom in the west valley, Tamarack isn't blooming yet, and dandylions are everywhere.  Alot of the early fruit bloom was knocked off by the snow mid April, but cherries and plums are still coming.  Lots to look forward to.  Keep in mind, unless your a suburban beekeeper in the valley, it gets pretty dry and by July, is pretty much over.  I move some hives up near Wanship later and get a fair wildflower harvest.  Can't leave em there, winters a long time going up that high.

I've never used a frame feeder, so I can't help you with that.  Once you get a few frames of bees emerging, you can take em off welfare and make em work for a living.  They claim the bees lose interest in the feeders when nectar starts coming in.  I can't confirm or deny that because I stop feeding as soon as I feel they are on their feet.  Keep the bee escape in a drawer somewhere.  If you got your woodenwear from Jones, all their innercovers have a vent cut in them.  My bees always use it as the primary entrance until they get crowded a bit.
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