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Author Topic: hive number 2 has come back alive  (Read 854 times)
tom
House Bee
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Posts: 377

Location: buffalo junction virginia


« on: April 23, 2006, 11:32:04 PM »

Hello a week or two ago i hived two 3#packages of bees into two hives each one contained one frame of honey and three frames of drawn comb. Well hive one and two started off taking in about two jars of syrup a day and then i did my first inspection and they had all the frames full of pollen and syrup so i asked for help on this and i got the advice i needed well hive one is kicking butt but then hive two stopped and i was worried because they were not working as much as the first one but the bees are looking good but they would not attempt to work hard like the first one well it rained over the weekend and then today the sun came out and warmed up. SO i went to check on them and hive one had bees coming and going but hive two was not doing nothing so as the day went on and it got warm i went back and hive two was rolling bringing in pollen and nectar so i guess maybe i got worried about them but you can here them roaring like hive one and they may have been drawing out more comb and they just was waiting for something else to happen but they are back working so should i give them some food or just let them keep on going i just wish i knew why they were not working like hive one.

Tom
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manowar422
Guest
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2006, 09:17:28 PM »

Tom,
Please put your location in your profile.
Most of the time this makes your questions
easier to answer.

I'm just guessing here, but could #1 hive
be getting hit with direct sunshine earlier
in the day than hive #2 Huh

Sometimes hives can be slow to get going if
the sun doen't get the chance to warm up
the bees.

If your location is still having cool weather
the overnight low temperatures can keep
the bees in the hive until well after daybreak.
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tom
House Bee
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Posts: 377

Location: buffalo junction virginia


« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2006, 01:15:44 AM »

Thanks alot for telling me that i forgot my location  i did a check on my hive 2 and found that my queen is gone and three queen cells but i would like to know is they have plenty of pollen and nectar but when my new queen comes where is she to lay eggs if they have all of the frames full of this and is there away to maybe move the frames they have half way drawn out and put here next to it and by the time she is out she will have some cells to lay in. My hive 1 is doing well and my queen is laying well but they are still a little low in workers but i did see some young carniolan workers and some cordovan carniolan mix they are a beautiful bee they are black around the head and stinger and a gold color in the middle but what can i do for the queenless one with the room being taken for all pollen and nectar should i move the combs around there is some capped brood i just want to give my new queen some room for laying.

Tom
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manowar422
Guest
« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2006, 10:17:32 AM »

Quote
should i move the combs around there is some capped brood i just want to give my new queen some room for laying.


By the time your virgin queen is mated and returns to the hive ready
to lay eggs, a least some of the cells of what is now capped brood
will have emerged which will free up cells for her to lay in.
The stores will be used up quickly raising larva so I wouldn't panic
just yet.

You'll need to keep a close eye on brood space once the queen
begins laying at full speed. If your brood nest boxes (IMO, two deeps
or three medium supers) are drawn and in place, just make sure
you are going to have boxes with frames to add when needed for
nectar storage.

If your feeding now you might want to slow down a bit since their
food needs without a laying queen are minimal Smiley
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