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Author Topic: Moving from 10 frames to 9 frames  (Read 1340 times)
DBoire
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« on: April 20, 2006, 09:25:07 PM »

Today I pulled one frame from a 10 frame honey super I left on the hive for winter feed. I want to move to 9 frame supers for honey.  The pulled frame has about 10 sq.in. of capped honey and I don't know what to do with it.  Should I
1) scrape out the honey, destroying the comb and let it drip & give to the bees to clean and then store?
2) Store it as is in a moth proof bag until needed?
thanks,
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TwT
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Ted


« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2006, 09:51:45 PM »

scrap off the capping and let the bee's clean it up....  you can just put it out in the yard away from the hives, some might say to put it above your intercover but I have never tried that. I just put it in the yard.... dont destroy any comb if you dont have too, you can store the frame with drawn comb and get it filled later or the next year...
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2006, 07:13:44 AM »

Why not put it up in the next super?

What is it on?  Plastic foundation?  Thin surplus wax foundation?  Wax brood foundation? You can harvest it however is appropriate for the kind of foundation.  Cut comb if it's unwired wax.  Scrape it off the plastic and strain it if it's embossed plastic.
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Michael Bush
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Jack Parr
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2006, 07:27:01 AM »

Quote from: TwT
scrap off the capping and let the bee's clean it up....  you can just put it out in the yard away from the hives, some might say to put it above your intercover but I have never tried that. I just put it in the yard.... dont destroy any comb if you dont have too, you can store the frame with drawn comb and get it filled later or the next year...


I have placed frames with some  honey in a hive box as appropriate, over the INNERCOVER and the bees do indeed clean it out. Scratch the caps. I also place some comb with honey, from removals, in a tray over the innercover and the bees clean that out. Honey is what bees use for comb building as per Finsky, 4 kg honey for 1 kg wax?  In fact I am doing that right now and will add some more loose comb and honey today to new swarms that I've hived.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2006, 11:27:13 AM »

Am I missing something? Why not just put it in the next super up?
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Jack Parr
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2006, 08:35:57 AM »

Quote from: Michael Bush
Am I missing something? Why not just put it in the next super up?


THAT would be a super good idea, except maybe the dude ain't ready fo da new honey supas wink

Ok so how could a person remove and keep some frames of honey and pollen, no brood, to relieve a honey bound or crowded condition with the view of swarm prevention. A situation that I encountered. I have no place to store these frames, so wat do ah do? I am not ready to extract either but I suppose I could if that were the only solution. And when and if you want to extract and the honey, in frames, is capped but there is also pollen what happens. It's all good  smiley

Moving the frames up, if deep, presents a problem smiley  I have two deeps for brood boxes and way too much honey in comb/ frames mixed with pollen.

I did place a new, empty, medium box with new undrawn frames over the bottom brood box currently used with thought in mind of running a deep and a medium as brood boxes. I moved the deep with honey and some pollen mostly filled, no brood, higher above a queen excluder to keep the new queen down. Now it's hard to keep a new queen down," just like a good man " wink , but I am looking to lighten things up or down depending.
Those deep 10 frame deep  boxes are a chore to deal with. I really should have gone to all mediums and may well do so, but later.

So wats da story smiley
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2006, 10:42:25 AM »

You can freeze any of them.  Even if you don't have room for all of them all the time, you can freeze them to kill any wax moth eggs or worms and then put them somewhere they will stay clean and dry.  You can extract the honey.  The pollen will keep better frozen.  If you don't have an extractor, you can cut the honey out and crush and strain.  You can use them to start a split.  Smiley
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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