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Author Topic: DRONE FOUNDATION  (Read 2100 times)
COLVIN
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Location: COBBTOWN, GEORGIA


« on: April 03, 2006, 10:22:25 AM »

I PUT IN DRONE FOUNDATION THIS WEEKEND FOR VARROA METHOD  OF REMOVING MITES WITH OUT CHEMICALS. I PUT ONE FOUNDATION IN CENTER OF BROOD NEST AND ANOTHER ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE FRAMES. HIVE HAS TWO HIVE BODIES. IN A WEEK THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO HAVE DRAWN OUT THE COMB ANDS SHOULD THEN START LAYING DRONE. AFTER THE SECOND WEEK I AM SUPPOSED TO TAKE OUT (IF CAPPED) THE DRONE COMB AND UNCAP AND CLEAN. DO I MOVE THE OTHER DRONE COMB IN TO THE BROOD NEST? I PUT IT IN SO THE BEES COULD START DRAWING IT OUT ALSO. IF NOT CORRECT SO FAR PLEASE ADVISE.  COLVIN
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Finsky
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Location: Finland


« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2006, 11:58:54 AM »

I think that it is too much to put in one time whole frame of drones. When drones' cycle time is 4 week you should have all the time larvae, where mites go just before caping.

You  think 4 week period it makes 3-4 whole brood frame . If you think your whole brood area in hive, it is  much.

I suggest that you cut your  drone comb in 3 parts and give one part every week in different frame.

It is better to make smaller frame inside langstroth frame and put drone comb-frame inside.   Frame is easy to handle and you do not waist your drone foundation.

Then cut heads from capped drone brood and with garden hose clean combs and shake water out.

Mites prefer old combs. That is why I am going to build those "drone comb emelents"


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Jay
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Location: Concord, MA


« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2006, 01:06:07 PM »

I agree with Finsky, two frames are more than you need. I run 1 frame of drone comb per box. And I would not place it in the middle of the brood nest, I place mine in position 3 or 8 on the outer fringe of the brood nest. When you take out the capped frame, put it in your freezer. This will kill all the mites (and drones) and then scratch the cappings open and give it back to the hive and they will clean it out and the queen will lay it up again for the next round! Cheesy

I use this method in conjunction with screened bottom boards, and food grade miniral oil soaked paper towels which the bees tear up and remove thereby getting the oil all over them which increases grooming behavior. These are my IPM methods and this year I will be starting some bees on natural sized cells as well. Good luck! Cheesy
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By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
Davzbeez
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Location: Brush Creek, Tennessee


« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2006, 08:10:50 PM »

Jay,

Do you use thymol with your FGMO?  I've been reading all of the discussion about it with interest, and just wanted another opinion before I start my hives this year.  Also, how often do you put a new paper towel in?

Dave
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Apis629
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2006, 09:36:23 PM »

How effective are these IPM techniques, Jay?  What is you're usuall mite count in a sugar roll?  I've been wanting to try something along IPM for a while and based on what I'm seeing in my colony, I really need to get in gear.
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Finsky
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« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2006, 02:05:20 AM »

Quite awfull to read your writings. You nurse mites more than bees.  Tongue  

I handle my bees once in late autumn and it takes 20 seconds to give oxalic acid trickling. Idea is press mite level very low before next summer.

Drone cell area is very usefull. So I see how much I have mites. If you do not have drone area they make drone cells here and there.

If you use some cure, read original writings of authorities or researches. These hobby writings are not good to follow.

If you take your self medicin you surely follow doctor's orders, an not nabour's ideas.
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heidip
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Location: eastern mass, cape cod


« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2006, 03:27:51 PM »

Hi, I've hived a new package of bees on 9 april, and would like to add a shallow frame to each of my deeps, so that they'll create drone comb off the bottom, that I can then cut off...but when should I introduce that frame into the hive...my colony is very young and hasn't drawn out more than 4 frames or so at this point..so I'm looking for an idea of timing here? Thanks for any advise.
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Jay
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Location: Concord, MA


« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2006, 05:15:02 PM »

Quote from: Davzbeez
Jay,

Do you use thymol with your FGMO?  I've been reading all of the discussion about it with interest, and just wanted another opinion before I start my hives this year.  Also, how often do you put a new paper towel in?

Dave


No, I don't use thymol, only the IPM methods discussed before. I put a new paper towel in if they have completely removed the previous one. The paper towels I use are cut to fit into a NEW baby diper wipe container (dry and never been used for anything), so they are each about half a paper towel in length.

Quote from: Apis629
How effective are these IPM techniques, Jay? What is you're usuall mite count in a sugar roll? I've been wanting to try something along IPM for a while and based on what I'm seeing in my colony, I really need to get in gear.


I don't do a sugar roll, I do a drop count and look for mites when I scratch the cappings off the frozen frame before giving it back to the hive. The most I've counted in a drop count is less than 5. I have yet to see any on the uncapping of the drone frames, although I'll admit I don't look very hard in the cells, if any come out on the uncapping fork, I'll look at them but I don't try to pull out every drone larvae to inspect it. Cheesy
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By the rude bridge that arched the flood
Their flag to Aprils breeze unfurled
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world
-Emerson
Finsky
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Location: Finland


« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2006, 06:36:27 PM »

When you have spring or summer, it is not time count or control mites.
You just take drone brood area away and look how much they have mites. If they have some, it is OK.  If they have hundreds, maybe you need do something. Dutch drone system is only what I recommend during summer.

Next step is when honey yield has taken away after honey season.

Mites are not main issue in beekeeping.
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