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Author Topic: setting out new hives  (Read 1201 times)
buzzbee
Ken
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« on: April 02, 2006, 12:45:47 PM »

I saw this question posted at beesource web forum. I also have new hives with new foundation. I am gewtting bees on the 22nd of April. Can I set the hives out now or should Iwait to keep out other bees and is it possible wax moths would invade. The frames have a duragilt foundation. Thanks,Ken
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manowar422
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« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2006, 01:26:57 PM »

I'm hiving two packages today. I set up my hives yesterday morning
but kept them closed up tight until installing bees today. IMO if you
put them out too early the pests will have first crack at the stuff inside.
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Robo
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« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2006, 06:30:12 PM »

Can I set the hives out now or should Iwait to keep out other bees and is it possible wax moths would invade.

Wax moths won't bother foundation. They only bother frames that have had brood raised in them.  If you put them out, just block off the entrance, and they should be fine.

The frames have a duragilt foundation.

You may want to consider different foundation next time.  Duragilt has a smooth plastic core. If you put it on when there is no nectar flow, they will strip the wax off.  Once the wax is stripped off, they will never build it back.  If you want foundation with plastic core,  choose one that has the cell pattern in the plastic.
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Romahawk
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« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2006, 10:35:12 PM »

Quote from: Robo
Wax moths won't bother foundation. They only bother frames that have had brood raised in them.


Are you saying that I can set out bait boxes with frames from a honey super that has not had brood in it and not have to worry about wax moths? If so it seems like the drawn frames from a honey super would be the way to go. That should really get a swarm off to a great start shouldn't it?
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« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2006, 07:41:57 AM »

>Are you saying that I can set out bait boxes with frames from a honey super that has not had brood in it and not have to worry about wax moths?

You'll still get wax moths. But they won't flourish like they do in old brood comb.  The old brood comb will do a better job of attracting a swarm.  Spray it with some Certan and the wax moths will leave it alone.

> If so it seems like the drawn frames from a honey super would be the way to go. That should really get a swarm off to a great start shouldn't it?

IMO letting the draw their own would give then natural sized cells and a better start.  But old brood comb is a better lure.
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Michael Bush
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