Permacomb

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Michael Bush:
>1. I understand that you can melt bees wax on them to make the 4.9 cells. I would like a detailed description on how to do this. I have read several other threads on other forums they a lack a cohesive detail for idiots like me.

I've posted a detailed description many times.  I don't have one handy.  The essentials are that you need to heat the PermaComb to 200 F (it melts at 220 F) and dip it in 212 F wax (wax in a double boiler).  Then shake off the excess.  It's not complicated.  Just messy and time consuming.  You have to wait for the wax to run in (the bubbles to run out) wait for the wax to run out.  Shake it good and then put it in the frame rest of a box, upside down so it can finish draining.

>2. I have honey b healthy should I use this with a wax dip?

It would be a waste all the way around.  Wax dipped they are perfectly accepted already and the essential oils would evaporate off in the hot wax.

>3. I have frames with brood in the existing hives (a nuc and a deep), what should I do with them?

I'd probably put the Permacomb in the brood nest in between the deeps.  As soon as there is some brood in it, you can move it (and the queen) above an excluder in a medium box.  Then when the brood has emerged below you can harvest that honey.

>4. What about drone cells with no large cells I won't have any. I would
prefer to have some friendly drone vs AHB drones in the area.

The PermaComb is short.  They will build the drone comb on the bottom of the frames.  You can also supplement this with an empty frame in the between drawn comb and they will build what they want.

> So how do I get drone and for that matter queen cells when I have 10 frames of permacomb in a box?

The bees build the queen cells on the PermaComb the same way they do on old brood comb.  They build an annex on the side of a cell and float the worker out with royal jelly.

Understudy:
Quote from: Michael Bush

>1. I understand that you can melt bees wax on them to make the 4.9 cells. I would like a detailed description on how to do this. I have read several other threads on other forums they a lack a cohesive detail for idiots like me.

I've posted a detailed description many times.  I don't have one handy.  The essentials are that you need to heat the PermaComb to 200 F (it melts at 220 F) and dip it in 212 F wax (wax in a double boiler).  Then shake off the excess.  It's not complicated.  Just messy and time consuming.  You have to wait for the wax to run in (the bubbles to run out) wait for the wax to run out.  Shake it good and then put it in the frame rest of a box, upside down so it can finish draining.

Do you melt the wax and pour it into the permacomb and then shake the permacomb or do you place the wax on a baking sheet and place the permacomb flat on the baking sheet? Or is there some other way?
Quote from: Michael Bush


>2. I have honey b healthy should I use this with a wax dip?

It would be a waste all the way around.  Wax dipped they are perfectly accepted already and the essential oils would evaporate off in the hot wax.

>3. I have frames with brood in the existing hives (a nuc and a deep), what should I do with them?

I'd probably put the Permacomb in the brood nest in between the deeps.  As soon as there is some brood in it, you can move it (and the queen) above an excluder in a medium box.  Then when the brood has emerged below you can harvest that honey.

Neat idea I like that.

Quote from: Michael Bush


>4. What about drone cells with no large cells I won't have any. I would
prefer to have some friendly drone vs AHB drones in the area.

The PermaComb is short.  They will build the drone comb on the bottom of the frames.  You can also supplement this with an empty frame in the between drawn comb and they will build what they want.

So you mix permacomb and foundation frames?

Quote from: Michael Bush


> So how do I get drone and for that matter queen cells when I have 10 frames of permacomb in a box?

The bees build the queen cells on the PermaComb the same way they do on old brood comb.  They build an annex on the side of a cell and float the worker out with royal jelly.

Ahh so the reason a queen cell looks like a peanut is because the larva is floating out further in the cell?

Sincerely,
Brendhan

Michael Bush:
>Do you melt the wax and pour it into the permacomb and then shake the permacomb or do you place the wax on a baking sheet and place the permacomb flat on the baking sheet? Or is there some other way?

I heat the PermaComb and melt the wax in a turkey roaster that has a double boiler built in.  I dip the PermaComb in the wax and tip it this way and that until all the bubbles stop.   Then I shake it out.


It would be a waste all the way around. Wax dipped they are perfectly accepted already and the essential oils would evaporate off in the hot wax.

>3. I have frames with brood in the existing hives (a nuc and a deep), what should I do with them?

?So you mix permacomb and foundation frames?

Well, I do, but that's not what I'm talking about.  A medium frame is 6 1/4".  A PermaComb frame is 6".  The bees build a row of Drone cells between one box and the next.

>Ahh so the reason a queen cell looks like a peanut is because the larva is floating out further in the cell?

They look like a peanut because while a worker cell is horizontal a queen cell is vertical.  Not all queen cells have the larvae floated out, but many emergency cells do.  Bees don't trear down old brood cells very well because of the cocoons.

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