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Author Topic: Egss and no eggs  (Read 1147 times)
Kris^
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Location: Williamstown, NJ


« on: March 19, 2006, 07:59:26 AM »

The bees drew out the Miller frame I put in the hive last weekend just like the pictures I've seen.  I was kinda surprised they did it in 6 days, because the temperatures have been in the mid 40s to lower 50s all week (and overnight lows in the 20s).  No eggs in the comb yet, though.

I also found something weird.  When I removed the candy boards last week,  the colonies had begun building comb in the space left where the sugar had been eaten.  As I was cleaning them up yesterday, I saw eggs in the comb placed there by my strongest hive!  Now, the temperatures that week had been in the upper 60s and 70s.

I guess this is a good demonstration of the effects of temperature and population on the queen's propensity to lay.  

-- Kris
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2006, 12:53:52 PM »

What exactly do you mean by a "miller" frame?
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Kris^
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2006, 02:43:36 PM »

A frame with triangular pieces of foundation for the bees to draw out and put eggs in, to help in raising queens.  I dunno if that's the actual name for it, but I've read that's the Miller method of queen rearing, so . . . . .   Smiley

-- Kris
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2006, 07:14:11 PM »

That would be the miller method.  But often you just let them draw a frame and lay it and then cut the zig zag on it the bottom of the comb with the right aged larvae.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Jack Parr
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« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2006, 08:03:59 PM »

Micheal, do you cut the comb in a zig zag  from the foundation and strip that comb off and leave the foundation?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2006, 09:02:27 AM »

I use a Jenter most of the time.

There are, apparently, a number of variations, inculding using foundation to start with.

http://website.lineone.net/~dave.cushman/cellstarting.html
http://www.gobeekeeping.com/LL%20lesson_ten.htm

One can actually just tear down the lower side wall of the appropriately aged larvae.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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