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Author Topic: Bees Besieged (book)  (Read 1830 times)

Offline Finsky

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Bees Besieged (book)
« on: March 03, 2006, 04:06:22 AM »
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0936028181/103-9127153-1394231?v=glance&n=283155

I bought that book from Amazon. It is very interesting to read.

Book tells how Langstroth's hive invention started development of modern honey business. His invention was real revolution in 1851.

The next was:
1857 German Mehring made first foundation
1865 Austro-Hungarian von Hruscha made first extractor.

(foundation + extractor meant 100% rise in yield per hive)

After Langstroth's movable frames selection of good queens was possible. Real breeding of bees started.

Honey producers have met many big changes during last 20-30 years. When you have 1000 hives  it is not easy to meet disasters one after another in your job.

Very frank book, I wonder. Mostly history is so beautifull.

But after all the total yield of honey has remained  at same level. That is what I wonder.

Offline Ymbe

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Re: Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2006, 10:35:04 AM »
Quote from: Finsky

But after all the total yield of honey has remained  at same level. That is what I wonder.


Hi Finsky, I've not read this book, but it certainly looks like a fascinating read. I would like you to elaborate on one of the points you made though - are you saying that the total yield of honey has not changed according to this book?

Offline Finsky

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Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2006, 12:13:49 PM »
So books says and I have seen those figures from national honey reports. Differencies between years are quite small.
http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/reports/nassr/other/zho-bb/hony0201.txt

Offline Jack Parr

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Re: Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2006, 08:59:29 AM »
Quote from: Ymbe
Quote from: Finsky

But after all the total yield of honey has remained  at same level. That is what I wonder.


Hi Finsky, I've not read this book, but it certainly looks like a fascinating read. I would like you to elaborate on one of the points you made though - are you saying that the total yield of honey has not changed according to this book?


Finsky, other than the " beauty of History " is this book able to provide some NEW knowledge about beekeeping :?:

Personally, I have several books on the subject of beekeeping and at $ 25.00 per book, I am wondering if the investment, in this book,  would provide some NEW and USEFUL information for beekeepers TODAY.

I have nothing against buying books, just for the love of books, and History, but really everything I've read thus far is, or, getting to be repetious.

Finsky, while we are on the subject of new/old, what is your opinion on the new Verroa treatment by VITA-EUROPE Ltd. called APIGUARD :?: Have you considered this treatment.

Offline Finsky

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Re: Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2006, 10:27:42 AM »
Quote from: Jack Parr

Finsky, while we are on the subject of new/old, what is your opinion on the new Verroa treatment by VITA-EUROPE Ltd. called APIGUARD :?: Have you considered this treatment.


OK, I looked that Apiguard is based on thymol gas. Same affect we get with formic acid gas. It is done when hive has brood and out temperature is quite high.

You may read results from this research what we have made in Finland.

http://bees.freesuperhost.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1136436349

Reseach with 220 hives 3 years period 2000-2003:

 "The August treatments with formic acid or thymol have shown an average efficiency of 65-80 % in hives with one box. In hives with two boxes they  have a lower efficacy. Oxalic acid trickling is very important part of the concept. It is done to all hives after all of the brood has emerged in October/November. The research with simultaneous advising  has had a remarkable effect to beekeepers work. Almost all professional beekeepers, and half of the hobby beekeepers  use some kind of double treatments. In two years the percentage of beekeepers doing oxalic acid trickling has risen from 0% in 2000 to 35 % in 2002. 2002 was the first year for beekeepers to buy the pads for thymol treatments.18 % of beekeepers chose to use this method. "

August means that honey is taken away, hive is dropped to one or two box for winter.  That handling means that last brood for winter will be protected. Oxalic trippling handles the rest mites  when brood have emerged.

Offline Finsky

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Re: Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2006, 10:34:57 AM »
Quote from: Jack Parr

Finsky, other than the " beauty of History " is this book able to provide some NEW knowledge about beekeeping :?: .


Good question! - Nothing new when I think. Just supported old opinions  :P

But I liked those harsh things what they talked in the book. Comprehensiveness was important. Not "bolts or nuts" or "the best choise" as we like to talk without contex.

Offline Dick Allen

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Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2006, 12:22:39 AM »
My suggestion to anyone concerned about spending money for a book they are not familiar with is to get it from the library first.  Granted, your local library may not have the book, but I think most libraries (at least here in the U.S.) are part of the inter-library system and will get the book for you from another library. While there is sometimes a small charge for the service, it's often free.

Offline Jack Parr

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LIBRARY!!!!
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2006, 09:58:52 AM »
Now why didn't I think of that!  OF course of course!!!!

Dang this internet. It's taking away all of our once revered sources of obtaining information.

Hanging my head in shame I'm a gonna go to the library and apologize for my lack of consideration.

Thanks there Dick Allen.  As they say " cooler heads have prevailed " in this crises of the stingy.  As if 25 bucks were real money in these inflated???
times.

Offline Dick Allen

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Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2006, 01:05:17 AM »
I guess you're right Jack. $25.00 adjusted for inflation over the last 40 years probably isn't that much. Still, I can remember when hard cover books could be had for $3-$4 and soft cover, paperback, books were selling for 35¢. I, personaly, don't usually shell out $25 and over for a book (including a bee book) nowadays without checking it out first.

Offline Finsky

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Bees Besieged (book)
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2006, 02:41:01 AM »
Quote from: Dick Allen
I, personaly, don't usually shell out $25 and over for a book (including a bee book) nowadays without checking it out first.


I check likely book even it is 1$, but those internet books are bad in this situation.

 

anything