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Author Topic: What to do with honey  (Read 5702 times)
Wandering Buddhist
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« on: February 20, 2006, 02:45:31 PM »

Customers/friends often ask what they can do with honey.  To say "bake" is too general.  After telling them to put honey in tea, on toast, or as a substitute for sugar, I run out of ideas.  I am sure there are scores more things that can be/ are done with honey.  What are some of your ideas for what to do with honey?
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Understudy
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2006, 03:31:29 PM »

Well there is this cute red head that doesn't live to far from me, and I have few things in mind for use of honey and her................... Okay back to reality

Remember besides honey there is also beeswax, porpolis, and pollen.
Honey as a cough remedy and has many other medicinal benefits.
Use honey to make Mead
embalming fluid (okay not anymore but it was good enough for Egyptians)
sugar substitute


My quick two cents worth.

Sincerely,
Brendhan
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Wandering Buddhist
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2006, 03:43:17 PM »

Understudy, please PM me more about the redhead...

And I was thinking of more practical uses for honey to suggest to customers than embalming fluid... like, well, besides just on toast.

I did not forget the propolis, etc., I was just asking about honey but do share if you have something else of interest.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2006, 03:53:20 PM »

There are medical uses... might find more here;

http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/
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Finsky
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« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2006, 04:16:04 PM »

Making fillet of beef

* cut thump size pieces from fillet of beef

* Put olive oil to hot pan and fry chopped garlic in it to get aroma in oil. Take all garlic away.

* roast the fillet pieces light brown in oil

* add soya sauce and honey, and add some water and mix spices with water.
* let flesh to absorb spice juice in.

****************

Woked potatoe chips

Cook potatoes with peels
When they are ready, take peels of and cut potatoes in pieces.

Make aroma oil with garlic or with onion rings. Take onions away . Cast garlic away.

Wok potatoe chips in oil. Add some honey and soya sauce. Mix rosted onions with potatoe chips.

Add salt if needed
*********

Eat
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thomashton
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« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2006, 04:45:57 PM »

You flippin' eat it.

Also, there are plenty of great honey cookbooks out there. Check on Amazon.com. I believe Storey has a country wisdom booklet on cooking with honey too. Also, I read in the most recent Bee Culture (I think) that they will begin to put their favorite honey recipes in each issue again. Last Nov or Dec they had a great article, not just recipe but article about a honey glazed roasted goose. Got to try that, but need to get some new goslings and 6 mos or so on them before I try it.  Cheesy
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« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2006, 05:42:47 PM »

B-B-Q Sauce, you could add it to anything you cook, it add good flavor to anything, I even put it in tuna fish for sandwitches. also check the beemaster cook book.


Beemaster's Online Cookbook - www.beemaster.com/cookbook
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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2006, 08:48:39 PM »

I have a friend that replaces the sugar in baked goods with honey
honey is like 1 1/2 time sweeter then sugar I think , so you need to use less, and the other reason is sugar is dry , honey is wet!
 we mix honey with our peanut butter to make a spread, also my wife
used honey as the sweetener for a berry pie filling and won first place in a pie contest Cheesy

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Ymbe
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« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2006, 06:40:52 AM »

Hot thickly sliced toast, plenty of butter, plenty of honey. Just make sure your toast is thick enough to soak it all up. It's surprising how little time it takes to get through a pound...

I've found this site useful for recipes using honey:

http://www.honey.com/recipes/index.asp
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Jack Parr
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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2006, 07:13:54 AM »

Quote from: Ymbe
Hot thickly sliced toast, plenty of butter, plenty of honey. Just make sure your toast is thick enough to soak it all up. It's surprising how little time it takes to get through a pound...

I've found this site useful for recipes using honey:

http://www.honey.com/recipes/index.asp


Ymbe, you are living within a few klicks away from the folks who are the masters of the culinary arts, the French. They will no doubt have some of THE BEST receipes for what can be done with honey based on their sciences of the culinary arts.

I know I know the French are, well, not your fav folks.  wink  But really their preparation methods of food is unsurpassed. Bar none.

Well they, the French, are my ancestors and someone has to stand up for them. Tongue
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Wandering Buddhist
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« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2006, 07:30:56 AM »

The French... oh yes!  All of those marvelous sauces, still the staple of their cuisine, which were invented to cover up the stench and flavor of meats that had gone bad...  Cheesy   (True you know!)

There have been some nice suggestions so far, I look forward to reading more.
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Ymbe
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« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2006, 07:46:46 AM »

All I can say is that on the many occasions I have visited France I have always enjoyed the food, but I don't know of any specifically French honey recipes - in the interests of international relations I'll investigate this next time  Cheesy

I did note on the membership maps that there are just 3 members in France, so responses might be a bit limited and it is a good job they have a champion. Looking at the posts we have honey used in cookery for some distinct purposes:

- As a sugar substitute (though it might be truer to say, despite sugar's long history, that sugar is a honey substitute, as for a long time it has been too expensive and scarce to be wasted on the masses Cheesy)
- To enjoy the flavour/aroma of the honey as well as providing sweetness.

Personally I'd be most interested in recipes in this second category and take things a step further. Rather than the generic honey, what type of honey?

I have a great recipe for egg custard, for example, that specifically uses lavender honey (thank you France!).
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Finsky
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« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2006, 08:14:27 AM »

Quote from: Ymbe

- As a sugar substitute


It is not realistic to talk "sugar subsitute". Honey is not. In my country we use 30 kg sugar per person in a year and honey 0,5 kg.  Honey is 7 times more expensive than sugar.  There a lot persons who cannot stand honey's fine aroma. Sugar is just sweet and without aroma.
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Ymbe
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« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2006, 08:34:27 AM »

Quote from: Finsky
Quote from: Ymbe

- As a sugar substitute


It is not realistic to talk "sugar subsitute". Honey is not. In my country we use 30 kg sugar per person in a year and honey 0,5 kg.  Honey is 7 times more expensive than sugar.  There a lot persons who cannot stand honey's fine aroma. Sugar is just sweet and without aroma.


Finsky, let me clarify: I was referring here to using honey as a sugar substitute in so called honey recipes which are merely recipes that have been manipulated to use honey instead of sugar rather than specifically designed to bring out the flavour/aroma of honey as a compliment. I'm most interested in the latter - if you're going to use honey in a recipe you may as well enjoy it and I agree about the relative price!

Something to think about regarding sweetness is that fructose does indeed taste sweeter than sugar and glucose less sweet than sugar. Again we come back to which honey to use as the overall sweetness you add to your dish will depend on the relative proportions of these sugars in the honey used.
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Jack Parr
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« Reply #14 on: February 21, 2006, 09:15:44 AM »

Quote from: Wandering Buddhist
The French... oh yes!  All of those marvelous sauces, still the staple of their cuisine, which were invented to cover up the stench and flavor of meats that had gone bad...  Cheesy   (True you know!)

There have been some nice suggestions so far, I look forward to reading more.


Aux armes les cityoens. Mon cher hommes tu est plus bete' que les Americain en generale.

Well I lived in France for seven years and I am an American and I can emphatically state that  I/we did with spoilt meat what should be done, throw it away and so do the French.

By the way, where were you, in this country, when all that washing the dressed chickens to remove the mold and green scum with some chemicals from those same chickens? Some of the chain food stores were doing that and one I recall was Food Loin. I suppose a sauce could possibly cover the off color and smell. ( True you know ).

And while I'm on a bad food roll, I would caution you on buying shrimp. There are some processors that do re-process frozen shrimp with some chemicals to enhance the look.  I don't buy frozen shrimp except from known, to me personally, sources.

I have tried " kidney pie " and for the sake of international relations I would have to say, ahem, I was not impressed. Maybe a lavish dash of the best honey would have helped, I dunno.   Tongue I really wanted to enjoy kidney pie but it was more than I could do. How do you English peeps eat that stuff?  huh

I will also say that I don't recall ever using honey per se in France. However the French cooking techniques seperate flavors. They are not into sweet and sour. Maybe as a novelty perhaps but generally no.

I will stick to my story: If you are into really learning about food the French are the Masters of the art. Bar none.

Next in line are us CAJUNS.

I rest my case. cheesy
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TwT
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« Reply #15 on: February 21, 2006, 11:33:08 AM »

Quote from: Jack Parr


Next in line are us CAJUNS.

I rest my case. cheesy




oh being from Louisiania and lived there my first 22 years I got a say in this, the french are famous for there fine, and nice looking foods, but when it come's to eating, give me CAJUN FOOD ANYTIME OVER ANY OTHER, I was raise on it,,,,,,,,,,

BEST EATING IN THE WORLD IS A GOOD OLD FASHION CRAWFISH BOIL  
 SEASONED JUST ENOUGH WERE YOUR NOSE STARTS RUNNING AFTER THE 3RD CRAWFISH,,,,,, THEN A SHOT OF BEER,,,,,NOW THATS EATING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 man im hungry now, I new I shouldn't have typed this,,,,,,,, BAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!! as golfy bro would say Wink
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Wandering Buddhist
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« Reply #16 on: February 21, 2006, 06:08:53 PM »

I stand by what I said about French sauces.  Please note that I did not insult the French, but merely provided some trivia.  The below is cut and pasted from a quick Google search:

Sauce making is a cornerstone to successful cooking. A sauce can either make or break your dish. Ages ago, when food preservation techniques were in their infancy, sauces were used to mask the foul taste of spoiled food. This is because the sauce is the first taste sensation your mouth experiences prior to masticating the main item. And even then, the flavor of the sauce is intermingled with the food. Nowadays sauces are used primarily for flavor, moisture, texture and color.

   Sauce making is a broad topic, deeply entrenched in French culinary history. Marie-Antoine Careme (1784-1833), a practical demigod of classic French cuisine, was the first to systematize the “mother sauces” and their derivatives. Mother sauces, otherwise known as the grand sauces, include demi-glace, (a reduced brown sauce), veloute, (a roux thickened white stock), béchamel, (a roux thickened milk sauce), tomato, and hollandaise, (a decadently rich butter and egg yolk sauce). From these fundamental sauces, countless secondary sauces are then made, such as bordelaise, sauce supreme, béarnaise, and Mornay to name a few. The advent of nouvelle cuisine sparked a movement away from rich, heavy, roux-thickened, time consuming sauces to lighter and simpler creations.

You can read the entire thing here: http://www.culinarycult.com/columns.php?sort=titles&sortorder=ASC&columnsid=83&from=archive
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Wandering Buddhist
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« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2006, 06:09:50 PM »

Oh and THANKS TwT for making me so hungry!
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JP
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« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2006, 03:55:24 PM »

I put honey in oatmeal along with bee pollen. I lost my bee pollen in the hurricane(had some in the freezer) it was from a friend who is a local bee keeper. It was sweeter than what I have now (Just received 5 lbs from drapers) pretty good but more bitter than sweet. Solved the puzzle by adding it to my oatmeal with honey.

I also like honey with peanut butter & especially like honey in iced green tea.

Honey is very good also on pork.
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« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2006, 04:14:33 PM »

Have a wonderful recipe for honey butter and oh so simple and delicious! You take already whipped butter (usually found in tubs) and then add honey and whip with an electric mixer. Then add a touch of cinnamon and just a touch of brown sugar and OH MY good on warm toast. The butter melts down and the honey flavors it perfectly.  Also good on toast cooked in the oven for it gives a crisper taste.  Give it a try, really easy and can start small first like with small tubs of butter.  You can hand whip this but oh my easier to use the electric mixer.  Enjoy! Cheesy
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« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2006, 05:41:32 PM »

I use honey in my chilli, it gives that sweet and hot taste conflict, of course when I make chilli I usually clean out the fridge and any leftovers are fair game to go into the chilli. Honey is probably the only stable, consistant ingrediant!
John
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Larooo
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« Reply #21 on: March 19, 2006, 02:13:22 PM »

I am currently making 3, six gallon batches of mead, This is appx four gallons of Honey and I still had plenty to go around. This will yield about 90 bottles of wine. I flavored each batch different. Nutmeg for the first batch, Blackberry for the second and clove & cinnimon for the final batch. We'll see how it comes out in about three more months
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« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2006, 10:55:24 AM »

Larooo'
I am also a mead maker and have been for about 5 years. I have 5gal. batch of a grape pyment- a 5 gal. batch of pomagranite- and a 5 gal batch of black cherry going. also I make cysers which is honey and apple cider fermented- very good.
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« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2006, 08:07:49 PM »

jdesq
Pomagranite, how interesting! let me know how that comes out. Let me ask you some advice, I have a mead that won't drop below 1.080, I have not stableized it yet. I have heard that you should not untill it drops to .095 or so. Any thoughts?
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mountain mike
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« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2006, 09:21:37 PM »

i like peanut butter and honey on flap jacks,,,hits like lead... leads to bed.
       
                                                mm.
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« Reply #25 on: March 22, 2006, 10:21:51 AM »

Larooo'
It sounds like your fermentation has stopped. Maybe you should try to warm it up a bit. I like to ferment at  65 to 68 degrees but know of people who do it at 72 degrees. If nothing else repitch some yeast.
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Valarie
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« Reply #26 on: March 26, 2006, 12:38:40 AM »

Cornbread- in the batter and on top. On any bread or muffins- Yummy!!!
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« Reply #27 on: March 28, 2006, 01:33:43 PM »

Quote from: Wandering Buddhist
Customers/friends often ask what they can do with honey.  To say "bake" is too general.  After telling them to put honey in tea, on toast, or as a substitute for sugar, I run out of ideas.  I am sure there are scores more things that can be/ are done with honey.  What are some of your ideas for what to do with honey?


My wife (the cook in the partnership) has replaced sugar with honey in just about every recipe you can think of (using differing portions for the most part of course). My favorite: blueberry pie. YUM! With my own blueberries too. Smiley Smiley Smiley

We grill continuously, we make a large variety of sauces and rubs using honey... and whatever else is handy. I have eggs in the morning usually... with some honey. My coffee? Honey! Etc. etc. etc. I don't eat bread generally, but that is the obvious use - creamed honey is particularly nice for that.

You eat it! Smiley

Of course there are all the medical uses that folks have been talking about - especially cut's and burns. I use it in place of neosporine.

Oh yeah... you can feed your bees with it. Wink

Alternative use: bribing government officials? Haven't tried that. Maybe I will. I do have to stay away from the red heads. My at home brunette would disapprove. Smiley
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