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Author Topic: Access to water  (Read 473 times)
Newtobees
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Location: Middlesex County, VA


« on: March 01, 2014, 06:14:04 PM »

Whats the general proximity for fresh water to the hive.  The closest pond to my back yard is about 1/2 mile away.  Is this too far? Do people usually create a small water source near their hive?  How do you all address this issue?

Thanks,
NTB
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2014, 06:27:01 PM »

1/2 mile is fine, but in Middlesex county, I would think there would be smaller springs or drain ditches even closer for 11 months out of the year, most years. When not, there are likely sprinklers, leaking hoses, etc. that they could find water near the hive.

Yes, many keeps put water out for the hives.
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greenbtree
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2014, 06:39:04 PM »

The suggestion that a lot of beekeepers might bring up is that if you do put water out, don't make it TOO clean - bees seem to prefer mud puddles over pristine water, or clorinated or salt water pools over a bucket of clean water that you would put out for them.  My bees prefer the mud puddles around my horse troughs and also wetness around the mineral blocks.  I have very calm horses, so everyone gets along.

JC
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Joe D
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2014, 07:27:49 PM »

I have ponds within 200 yards of my bee.  But I have a couple of 5 gal buckets that I fill about half full and put a piece of Styrofoam in for them to land on.   If you have a neighbor with a salt water pool, you may want to fix your bees some salt water to help keep them out of neighbors pool.





Joe
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Steel Tiger
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« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2014, 11:28:26 AM »

 My field stays damp all year. Last summer I found a spot that the bees were using to suck the water out of the dirt. I stood and watched for a few minutes. Sometimes there were as many as 4 bees landing and sifting through the mud.
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ChrisT
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2014, 02:20:29 PM »

I used to worry about water too.. 1/2 mile is fine.. theyll find the water. The first year I left out water and they would use it in mid summer. Rest of the time they ignored it. I dont put out water anymore and theyve been fine.
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Royall
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2014, 07:57:46 PM »

Living here on the big island, we don't have a lot of standing water as it is all fractured lava rock. Has to rain real hard for quite sometime before any puddles appear and then they only last a few minutes. We do usually have rain at night and/or in the mornings. Will the bees go to the water that is on the grass and leaves, or do they prefer small ponds and mud puddles? I haven't put water out for them thinking that there is plenty of moisture.
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rwlaw
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« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2014, 09:52:14 PM »

I took a hunks of rain gutter and put ends on. Cut pieces on styrofoam on a table saw that fit inside. I always put about 4 or 6 tablespoons of mineral salt per 5 gal of water so I don't get a about bees playing in the pool.
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wouldliketobee
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« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2014, 10:21:04 AM »

I put out a 5 gallon  bucket with a hole drilled in the side under the lid then  I placed lid down in a homemade bird bath, the edges are rough surface , the bees line up all around the water line. I use clean tap water and the bees seem to like it, they are stuck on this location though ,I moved it a couple of feet and they kept hanging around the old location so I moved it back. Like others have said sometimes they ignore it. I also placed a mineral block out and they love the puddle that forms around it when it rains. 
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KD4MOJ
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« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2014, 08:42:16 AM »

I put out bird baths in the yard... some are about 30-50 feet from my colonies. I had an issue with a neighbor about my bees invading his pool. Seems they were drawn to the ladder in the deep in that was corroding where the steps joined the metal. Seems they were after minerals as well as the chlorinated water.

...DOUG
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T Beek
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« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2014, 09:07:49 AM »

I put out bird baths in the yard... some are about 30-50 feet from my colonies. I had an issue with a neighbor about my bees invading his pool. Seems they were drawn to the ladder in the deep in that was corroding where the steps joined the metal. Seems they were after minerals as well as the chlorinated water.

...DOUG
KD4MOJ


Bird baths are great!  Place some small stones in them for more 'LZ" area.  We're fortunate to have a pond right behind the house, but for the birds and the bees the 'baths' scattered around our gardens provide amazing entertainment.  Smiley….all summer long.
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capt44
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« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2014, 09:38:32 AM »

Here at the home place I call this beeyard the hospital for new colonies getting established.
I use a bird bath with SB2 gravel in the bottom.
I put sugar syrup in it.
But for water I have white 5 gallon buckets with 4 one inch holes drilled into the sides about 2 or 3 inches down from the top for over flow.
I put water in them then I covered the top of the water with Styrofoam packing peanuts, I call them bee boats.
The bees land on the peanuts and drink the water.
And I might add the bees prefer a white bucket over gray or other colors.
I put 2 buckets out, 1 white and 1 Lowes gray bucket.
They will use the white bucket 98% of the time.
An old satellite dish upside down works too for water or feed, just put gravel in the bottoms and plug the mounting holes.
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
Carol
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« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2014, 07:23:47 PM »

I have a bird bath about 10 ft from my hives...but most of the bees come to my little "frog" pond on the back porch. It is a very small concrete bowl with a couple of frogs. They also take water from the clothes I hang on the line....advice...if you hang your clothes out to dry...and they buzz when you fold them...please let the Honey Bee out.
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GSF
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« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2014, 09:15:03 PM »

capt44,

I've been using those satellite dishes for years as bird baths. Birds just love them! I think it's got a lot to do with the gentle slope into the water.
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