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Author Topic: Rubber band question  (Read 1461 times)
obxbee
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« on: February 21, 2014, 02:25:17 AM »

What size rubber bands should I get to hold brood comb in frames with when doing cut outs?
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2014, 03:11:35 AM »

I do not know the size number but the ones that I use are about 8-10" in diameter and 1/8" wide. You want something big enough to go around your frames but small enough that your bees can cut them and haul them out of the hives on their own. One of the first ones that I used was 1/2" wide. It took 2 weeks for them to cut them and a long time for them to get them sticking out the opening. I had to keep pulling them out my self. The 1/8" ones are small enough that the bees can fully remove them from the hive on their own.
Jim
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iddee
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« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2014, 06:57:07 AM »

I use a size 136. It is 6 inches X1/4 in. X 1/16 in. thick.


http://www.lee-rubber.com/sizes.htm
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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obxbee
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« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2014, 08:48:50 AM »

Thank you both.  I had sent a pm to JP but he must be busy as a bee.
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buzzbee
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« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2014, 10:04:23 AM »

Just a touch on a one time bad experience I had. if you buy a package of rubber bands, open them and stretch them to test the elasticity before you are ready to band comb into frames. i was all set to go one time and half of the rubber bands would break with very little stretching. I would hate to see that happen to someone in the middle of a removal.
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jayj200
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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2014, 11:37:35 AM »

the #19 from office depot works for me a little loose too stretchy  held comb nicely for me

jay
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G3farms
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« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2014, 11:46:25 AM »

Buzzbee you are so very right on this. When you open the package of rubber bands put them in a zip lock bag and keep them out of the sunshine. The "pure rubber" bands, kind of yellow looking, will start to break down rather fast. The colored ones seem to take the longest, not sure what is in them but must be some kind of UV  resistant stuff.

You also forgot to say what size frames you were using.

If you get bands that are too small they will bend the bottom bars and mess up your frames.

Bands too skinny will allow the bees to remove them before comb is attached good to the frames and you will have comb fall into the comb beside of it and get tied together.

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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

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gmcharlie
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« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2014, 01:18:35 PM »

I personly use yarn....  the bees clean it out on their own....  and you can pull it tight or as loose as you want...
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RC
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« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2014, 01:30:41 PM »

Chicken wire. And a stapler. You can staple one side to a frame, lay the comb on it, fold and staple.
No fumbling trying to hold the comb, frame and rubber band at the same time.
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buzzbee
Ken
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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2014, 01:33:02 PM »

We slide the rubber bands on the frames to one end before we start.The bees can remove the bands on their own.
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G3farms
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« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2014, 05:29:32 PM »

I have also found that using a piece of the plastic sign board helps in getting new soft comb into a frame.

With the bees off of one side of the comb lay it on the sign board, trim to size if needed, lay the frame around the comb (have rubber bands on both ends). Now tilt the sign board, comb and frame up and pull the rubber bands around it. The sign board just gives the new soft comb plenty of support, not like trying to pinch it between your fingers.
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
obxbee
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« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2014, 05:51:30 PM »

Im glad I posted thus because I got responses with stuff I had not even thought about. 
I like the yarn and chicken wire ideas just for the speed and simplicity alone.
I imagine I would be like a monkey with a football trying to get cut out sections of comb onto a frame frame the first time around.
And I will be using regular deep frames too. Sorry I left that off.

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JP
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« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2014, 02:51:02 PM »

Just sent you a PM, I like the #33 rubber bands


...JP
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Edgy
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« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2014, 12:29:41 AM »

obxbee, you read my mind.  I needed this info too.  Thanks!
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buzzbee
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« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2014, 05:58:51 AM »

Also, be sure to keep the comb oriented properly.  If you turn it sideways or upside down, the queen will not lay in it when the brood emerges.
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obxbee
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« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2014, 11:37:00 PM »

Oh Lord. I know I will screw that up really good then.
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iddee
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« Reply #16 on: March 02, 2014, 09:25:17 AM »

I orient it wrong on purpose, as I want to get it out as soon as the brood emerges. I don't want her laying in it again. You orient it correctly only if you want to leave it in the hive to be incorporated with the frames the bees draw out.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
nella
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« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2014, 01:07:19 PM »

I use rubber bands that I bought to hold the wings on my model airplanes, They are of good quality and can be bought at any model airplane store or on line.
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obxbee
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« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2014, 02:14:17 PM »

Iddee
What to you do with the comb after the brood emerges then if you do not want the queen to lay again in that comb?
Do melt it down later and recycle it?
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iddee
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« Reply #19 on: March 02, 2014, 03:22:24 PM »

Melt it down and sell it.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
obxbee
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« Reply #20 on: March 03, 2014, 12:11:16 AM »

Iddee
Would that comb be suitable for putting in nucs or swarm traps if you did not want to
Melt it diwn?
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iddee
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« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2014, 06:47:14 AM »

Sure. If oriented properly, it may be fine for years in the hive you set up from the removal. Nothing wrong with it.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
obxbee
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« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2014, 08:41:11 AM »

Thank you for sharing your knowledge Iddee
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greenbtree
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« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2014, 12:19:07 PM »

Oooh, love the sign board idea, going to combine it with the other thing I do.  You know how sometimes you have a beautiful piece of brood comb that will fit perfectly in a frame if you leave some honey comb with it?  I always bring a big rubbermaid tote with me and the rack out of an old refrigerator.  I duck tape the rack to the tote (otherwise it tends to scoot around, especially once slick with honey)  and lay the comb on that while cutting and putting it in the frame, it reduces the comb piece getting all smeared with honey.  Since we aren't all as good at casually cutting and popping it perfectly into frames like JP is grin

JC

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