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Author Topic: Bees+agriculture  (Read 630 times)

Offline Bush_84

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Bees+agriculture
« on: February 11, 2014, 11:27:48 PM »
Hello all.  Quick question about bees and fields.  I am moving this spring.  Where I live in minnesota is mostly woods and lakes.  Very few farms.  The area I am moving to definitely has a lot of farms.  We have looked at two houses.  One house doesn't have any next door fields, but likely some withing flying distance.  The other has a field right next to the house.  Actually really the only place to put the bees is close to this field.  How concerned should I be about this?  Anybody with experience with this? 
Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2014, 07:47:49 AM »
The bees will forage the 8,000 acres around you.  It's pretty difficult to avoid agriculture.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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Offline T Beek

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2014, 07:56:16 AM »
I suppose it depends on what is being grown if anything, in those fields.  IMO;  Best case scenario, an unplanted meadow full of wildflowers or a hay field with clover or alfalfa.  That said; I'm sure you already know the bees will travel far and wide to forage.  The other concern of course is 'what' if anything might have been sprayed on those fields.

My bees are next to a 5-8 acre meadow, surrounded by forest and lakes, that turns gold every Fall with the Goldenrod bloom.  :)

Many Beeks put their hives right next to or even in the middle of fields, both cultivated and not, so It 'shouldn't' be an issue, unless any of the above factors are added.  I'd go talk with my neighbors if it was me and my bees.

Good Luck with the move!
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline Bush_84

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2014, 09:53:11 AM »
My concern is no so much them going out to forage but rather a farmer spraying and killing the whole hive off because the hive was to close to the field.  How close is close to close and how far is far enough?  Again I get it that bees will fly for miles but it's a different story when a hive is bathed in the stuff.  

Edit-we have chosen a house yet.  So we still have options.
Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.

Offline stanisr

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2014, 10:57:55 AM »
My bees are located next to agriculture land. Some of it mine and some of it not, but the neighboring farmers welcome my bees and we have made agreements that they tell me a couple days in advance of any spraying. They get a pint or two of honey at Christmas time and they have been very good thus far. So my advise is to talk to your farmer neighbors, and most of the time they will be very good to work with.
Rick

Offline Bush_84

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2014, 11:13:13 AM »
So if my hives are within 10 feet of a field I won't have to be concerned about spraying so close to the hives? 
Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.

Offline T Beek

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2014, 11:45:25 AM »
I think the predominant advice is to talk to your prospective neighbor (s), or whoever owns, uses the fields you are concerned about.  Communication is key IMO.  "They" should know that there are honeybee hives around (your responsibility) and in return you should know what your bees may have to deal with (their responsibility). 

You might decide you that don't want your bees or your family anywhere near those fields…OR, you might decide that you can place them right next to the fields……...

If it was me I wouldn't wait for 'something' to happen before doing the simplest thing  ;).  (bring some honey along if you have some)   Hope it all works out for you, your bees and your neighbors…..
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline Bush_84

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2014, 12:58:54 PM »
So once I have my list down to a few possibilities I should start asking around before I make an offer on a house?  I think that sounds like a good idea.
Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.

Offline capt44

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2014, 01:22:10 PM »
Here is a map that you can drop a pin where your hives will be located and it will show the 3 mile radius of where the hives will be.
http://bees.morkland.org/coverage/
As far as the farmer spraying, like previoiusly mentioned see the farmer, but I will tell you that too much and he'll bow up on you.
Richard Vardaman (capt44)

Offline Bush_84

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2014, 02:50:32 PM »
My main concern seems to be overlooked by the fact that bees fly for miles.  But again how close is to close for a hive next to a field assuming they spray?  Am I wrong assuming that spraying pesticides within a certain distance has a chance to kill an entire hive at once?  If there is a distance that should concern me, what should I do when they spray?  It'd be a pain to move the hives when they spray.  I assume you'd want to close them up somehow, but how do you do that without suffocating them? 
Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.

Offline Joe D

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2014, 04:02:18 PM »
On worrying about how close to the actual spraying can you have your hives, it would depend on what chemicals were being sprayed and the wind direction at that time.  Good luck to you and your bees.





Joe

Offline T Beek

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2014, 04:16:04 PM »
It depends on 'when and what' is being sprayed….and to know for certain... you must talk with………your neighbors  :)  

If your bees are hitting on something 5 miles away, can you control what is being sprayed?   Don't think so.  If the field right next to them is being sprayed you and your bees are at risk.  Its as simple as that.   For the sake of your bees and your family, It is your duty to know what is going on nearby, but that doesn't mean you have any control over it  :(.

Despite an 'assumed' available bloom in a field within eye site, your bees may be foraging on something else entirely…. it happens all the time, every season, and there is little that Beekeepers can do about it.  They are 'WILD' insects and make their own decisions

Bees will tend to hit on 'one' main bloom until the nectar has been exhausted or at least until scout bees convince enough workers to move over to the next foraging stage.  It will occur regardless of any beekeeper precautions  or whether the area has been sprayed, unfortunately.
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline jayj200

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Re: Bees+agriculture
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2014, 09:41:32 PM »
i live in the city
i/4 mile from a hospital
clean freaks i fear
my two hives died out, i here 7 others in my neighborhood died too.
no farms for 5 to 10 miles

 

anything