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Author Topic: wood ashes and SHB larva  (Read 802 times)
Carol
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« on: January 27, 2014, 12:00:07 PM »

Will SHB larva cross wood ashes?  I have about 6 inches of millings (crushed blacktop) under my hives with tiles over it. I have been dumping the ashes from my woodstove around the edges. I had read that ants dont like to cross them and wondering if SHB larva will. Hoping to stop the cycle naturally.
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rober
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« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2014, 01:01:02 PM »

like diatomaceous earth any effects will be washed away with the 1st rain. the ashes would probably be of more use on your garden. a speaker at the 2012 HAS event mentioned using rock salt with some limited success since the larva can travel pretty far. some limited success has been noticed using nematodes. I use rock salt around my hives for weed & grass control so that I do not need to mow close to the hives. I've not noticed ant changes in beetle populations. here's a link. soil treatment is mentioned down low on the page.

http://www.extension.org/pages/60425/managing-small-hive-beetles#.Uuab8rLnbIU
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GSF
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« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2014, 07:08:29 PM »

As Barney would say; "Nip it in the Bud!" Wink

Kill them while they are adults and you won't have to worry about the babies. I love my IPK oil trap! My max count was around 50 shb, then I put the oil tray in and it kept going down. Toward the end of last summer on a few occasions I didn't see any in the hive, all in the oil tray. SHB are not a problem any more for me. (knock on wood).
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dprater
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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2014, 08:13:58 PM »

I put 3 SHB larva in a jar with a little diatomaceous earth last year 24 hrs later all three were still alive one lasted two days. Not sure how a little on the ground could help much. I've also seen them crawl through my oil pan and over the side, they are tough little guys.

dan
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rober
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« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2014, 12:53:06 PM »

last summer I posted about having wax moth larva in stored frames. I took those larva to the the st Louis zoo bug house. they i.d them as shb larva. these frames were treated with BT, had been frozen for a week, & had moth crystals on them. the larva survived. when I was tapping the frames against a piece of plywood to knock out the larva I swept them into a bucket of BT solution thinking they were wax moth larva. they were unfazed & crawled right out of the bucket. even being submerged for a time did not slow them down. the frames had not been slimed so I refroze them for 2 weeks. that ended the problem. since this came up I've done some more reading ( getting cabin fever ) & it seems a heavy drenching of the soil with goldstar or some other permethrin based sprays seems to help. I for one though do not want any poisons around my hives. I still think nematodes would be best. the larva are stationary while they pupate making them an easy lunch for the nematodes. of course killing off the adults is the best bet but killing all the adults is not a realistic possibility. I've abandoned my secondary yard. the beetle population there was extremely high there & no hives survived there  2 years running. those hives were shaded most of the day & the soil was sandy. they were also 30 ft from train tracks. the combination of train noise & vibration, creosote fumes, & high beetle populations may have been a lethal combo. in 2012 the bees did not survive the winter. in 2013 they did not survive the summer.
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Variable
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« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2014, 01:47:51 PM »

I am having a hard time finding a good link but I heard a podcast at BKCorner.com (Episode 37 at 24:37 – 37:47 | Segment 2: Small Hive Beetle and Varroa, This is Really Cool) where they took ground up adult hive beetles and mixed it with soil. The larva would not go into the soil to pupate. They would rather die than go into the soil with ground up adult SHB. This was discussed at the ABF Conference in 2013 (I think that is the right year... it was in Hershey Pennsylvanian if that helps narrow it down) The part of the discussion about the SMB was called "Line in the Pan" as a play on line in the sand and I am not sure who was presenting it. EDIT: Dr. Peter Till from the USDA lab in Gainesville FL (not sure of spelling) was the presenter.

Hope you can find a good link.... The weird thing about the link is I can play it on my IPhone but not on my computer. My computer tells me the file is corrupt but my phone opens and plays it fine.
Here is the link (I think it is the correct episode) just fast forward to the 24 min mark... I am going to listen again and may update this if I can get better info out of it.

http://www.bkcorner.org/audio/BKCORNER_episode-037_02-19-2013.mp3

Good luck!

EDIT: This is the correct episode... go to the 31 min mark to hear the part on the SHB.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 01:58:56 PM by Variable » Logged

I want to beelieve.
WA Apiary ID WA14-077
3 Langstroth Medium hives, 1 nuc.
See data on one hive at http://twolittleladiesapiary.com/hivedata.php
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HWDylan
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2014, 12:14:05 PM »

That is very interesting and exciting stuff Variable.

I wonder how long before they can get a commercial product based on that research? Also I wonder if just grinding up SHB carcasses and sprinkling them around hives would be effective in any way. I guess knowing how long this effect lasts is an important piece to that puzzle.

Cool stuff either way
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Variable
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2014, 12:55:39 PM »

HWDylan,
I thought it was interesting also. From what I can find on it sprinkling ground up SHB would keep the larva from pupating in the ground at that location. Of course it will need to cover an area large enough that the larva couldn't just crawl out of the area and pupate anyways....
I do not have a hive yet and am not sure if SHB will be a problem here in the Northwest... but if they start to be a problem this is one of the things I will try to slow down their reproduction.
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I want to beelieve.
WA Apiary ID WA14-077
3 Langstroth Medium hives, 1 nuc.
See data on one hive at http://twolittleladiesapiary.com/hivedata.php
https://www.facebook.com/twolittleladiesapiary
jayj200
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« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2014, 05:23:22 PM »

I used to be an organtic Gardner years ago. still do not like chemicals!
I want to concur with Varible back then 40 years back. They were say-in the same thing blend up your bug, bugs mix with water and spray. outside sure.. want to use this on roaches in the kitchen? not me.

jay
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