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Author Topic: Wax moth issue!?!  (Read 2463 times)
CJ
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« on: January 29, 2014, 04:40:08 AM »

Hi all,

Quick question from a novice  huh

I had taken an 8 frame super of capped honey off my hives and stored it at our house for the last 3 weeks (was going to extract it but have since decided to use it making more splits).
I opened it up when moving it this afternoon to find it had a wax moth issue! Judging from pictures I have seen, I have gotten off very lightly with almost no damage to the frames and very minimal damage to the combs. I think its Galleria mellonella..?
I pulled all the pupal cocoons and as much of the web off the comb as I could and then put the frames in a freezer (-19c) to kill any remaining eggs and larvae.

My question (and hope) is - can I put these frames back in a hive for the girls to clean up so I can still use them for splits in a week? There are only 2/8 that had large amounts of dark, fermented honey in them, and I guess my concern is that this will make them sick.

Any advice or guidance would be very much appreciated  Smiley (I will try and get some photos up for you tonight)

Cheers,
CJ
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CJ
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2014, 04:55:02 AM »





« Last Edit: January 29, 2014, 02:29:45 PM by CJ » Logged
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2014, 05:21:00 AM »

CJ,
Just cut out the damaged area. The bees will fix it.
Your pictures will not load for some reason.
Jim
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"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed.  If you do read the newspaper you are misinformed."--Mark Twain
Michael Bush
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« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2014, 06:41:23 AM »

Bees have to work very hard to remove webs.  I'd remove the webs for them.  I wouldn't worry about the rest and they will clean it up, yes.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
BeeDog
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« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2014, 07:46:08 AM »

Just remove the "infected" area, you can still use the drawn frames. I do that with my frames I cut the parts that has wax moth eggs/larvae, put it back and the bees will repair the frame in no time.
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It is highly recommend that split be done with only strong healthy hives that have at least two Brood Chambers with Brood in all stages of development. Frames with capped Brood should be split evenly between the two hives.
CJ
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« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2014, 03:51:06 AM »

Thanks guys, not a total disaster after all (lesson learned though!!)  Smiley

Bees have to work very hard to remove webs.  I'd remove the webs for them.  I wouldn't worry about the rest and they will clean it up, yes.

Michael, would the frames be OK to go straight in the splits or should I leave them on a strong hive for a while first for the clean up?
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10framer
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« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2014, 10:23:12 AM »

you'll be fine, that's not that much damage.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2014, 07:31:37 PM »

>Michael, would the frames be OK to go straight in the splits or should I leave them on a strong hive for a while first for the clean up?

Either way is fine.  It's not that bad.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
G3farms
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« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2014, 03:35:37 PM »

That is not that bad of damage since wax worms prefer brood comb to honey comb.

Several days in the freezer, remove all of the webs and cocoons that you see and use where needed.
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
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