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Author Topic: By what name is Renson's limited broodnest method known in English?  (Read 466 times)
ugcheleuce
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« on: January 19, 2014, 05:43:32 PM »

[I also asked this question on a British beekeeping forum, but no-one there knew about it, so I'm reposting here.]

Hello everyone

[In beekeeping, the exact same thing is often known by different names in different countries (often having been "invented" by different people).]

There is a beekeeping method called "Renson-broedbeperking" (Renson's limited broodnest), designed by Henri Renson of France. Do any of you know this method, and/or by what name it is known in the English-speaking world?

http://www.imkerpedia.nl/wiki/index....broedbeperking (in Dutch)
http://www.bijenhouden.nl/pagina/met...dbeperking.asp (in Dutch)

At its simplest, the system uses three shallows (more shallows can be added on top as the honey yield increases). At the start of the nectar flow, you place the queen in the middle shallow, between two queen excluders. The bees eventually fill the lower box with mostly pollen, and the upper box with mostly honey. The middle box is the "limited broodnest". The queen can't lay many eggs, which means that bees are promoted to outside duty a lot sooner, which means that they live longer and bring in more honey and pollen. In a variation of this system, two vertical queen excluders are added, so that the queen can't reach the frames at the far ends of the middle super. A drone comb frame is added to the brood nest, and as soon as it is filled, it is replaced by an empty one (and the full one is moved to the other side of the queen excluder, and the drones are able to move about the top and bottom shallows, as it pleases them).

Does this sound familiar? What is it called in English?

Thanks
Samuel

PS... here's a picture of it, unfortunately also in Dutch:



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Samuel Murray, Ugchelen, Netherlands
6 hives in 3 locations (4 x Buckfast F2++, 2 x Ligustica F1+)
Bush_84
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2014, 07:14:12 PM »

Interesting...can't say that I have read or heard of that before.  Not sure what trapping the queen would do with drones.  You'd imagine drones would be stuck in the middle box.  In theory they couldn't swarm, but bees don't follow human reason lol. 
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Keeping bees since 2011.

Also please excuse the typos.  My iPad autocorrect can be brutal.
ugcheleuce
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2014, 07:24:25 PM »

Not sure what trapping the queen would do with drones.

A single drone frame is hung inside the queen's "cage", and as soon as it is full (or whenever), it is moved out of the cage (and replaced with an empty drone frame), so that the drones can leave the hive if they want to.  The full drone comb stays close to the brood nest, however (but on the other side of the queen excluder).  Obviously this method is not meant for those who leave their bees for a month or two before inspecting the hive again.
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Samuel Murray, Ugchelen, Netherlands
6 hives in 3 locations (4 x Buckfast F2++, 2 x Ligustica F1+)
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