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Author Topic: Bee keeping in heavily wooded areas?  (Read 978 times)
Leather Jim
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« on: January 14, 2014, 11:55:28 AM »

Anyone have any experience keeping bees in the forest? We are considering a land purchase in a national forest area and there doesn't seem to be much open land for many miles. Any thoughts would be appreciated. 

Jim
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2014, 12:06:53 PM »

You will need to take a walk through the woods in that area or ask your local extension agent. Here in FL the woods are full of gallberry, palmetto and the swamps are full of black gum. All of which are great for spring honey production but have nothing during the summer and sometimes nothing in the fall.
Jim
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10framer
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« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2014, 12:32:26 PM »

if the woods have tulip poplar, privet and sumac all within a few miles of you i would think you'd be ok.  i think all three of those plants range most of the united states.  i'd rather have bees in the woods than on giant corn fields.   
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chux
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« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2014, 01:29:09 PM »

Around here there are lots of flowering vines and plants in the swamp. Not sure about the forest where you are looking.
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iddee
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2014, 01:48:02 PM »

You have two scenarios here.

The forage would likely be sufficient for a half dozen or so hives. Right of ways, flowering trees, drain ditches, yards and home gardens, etc.

The next question is within 100 feet of the hive. If there are SHB in the area, and you don't have 10 or more hours of sun on the hives, they likely will be dead the first half of the first summer.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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HammerGa
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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2014, 05:59:37 PM »

I was up in national forest recently. a man owns 40 acres there. There was a trailer looked like it was built for hauling cattle with a metal roof added. I asked about it and was told that someone had bees there and it was built like that to keep the bears out. This is in N. Ga. mountains
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jredburn
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« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2014, 07:49:29 PM »

Bees lived in trees/forests for thousands of years before man learned to build houses.
Here in Fl there are State and National Forests that lease out large tracts to bee keepers.  There is a long waiting list for them.
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o.molchanov
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« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2014, 06:19:31 AM »

Which trees do grow here? I think you can get a huge profit by purchasing the land here.
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merince
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« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2014, 12:59:06 PM »

Here in NW Ohio, the bees do better when they are close to wooded areas and state/national parks.
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richter1978
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« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2014, 08:13:02 PM »

Sometime in August of this year I was at Newfound Gap right in the middle of the Smoky Mtns. National park (NC/TN border 4500').  6-10 miles to any serious cleared land and bees all over asters and golden rod.
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Leather Jim
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« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2014, 11:18:09 PM »

Thanks for all the imput, I'm going to travel down and try to determine what trees are growing there. Might be able to identify some of the underbrush also even though it's winter. Keep ya posted.
Jim
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chux
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« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2014, 07:49:24 AM »

Sometime in August of this year I was at Newfound Gap right in the middle of the Smoky Mtns. National park (NC/TN border 4500').  6-10 miles to any serious cleared land and bees all over asters and golden rod.

richter. that's a beautiful spot, isn't it?Huh I see honey bees in the mountains of NC, during the summer, when I am miles from cleared land.

I think the bigger issue to be dealt with will be shade, as mentioned. I would clear a little spot to give the girls as much sun as possible on the hive.
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richter1978
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« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2014, 09:27:14 PM »

chux, I love it there, got married atop the stone overlook! Smiley lotsa bees
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GSF
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« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2014, 05:28:35 AM »

Agreed about the beauty up there. It's therapeutic. On our way up we always stop by Rock City and take the walk through. Icing on the cake.
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Dunkel
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« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2014, 09:51:04 AM »

See Rock City.    I found out I was afraid of heights on top of a barn with See Rock City painted on the side.
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