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Author Topic: When to start V Mite treatment  (Read 1896 times)
labradorfarms
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« on: December 24, 2013, 10:26:37 AM »

When should you start mite treatmeant? Im a starting some new hives in April. I am starting out with package Bees. I don't want to depend on chemicals all the time but understand the V Mites need to be dealt with.
Should I treat my hives for mites as soon as the queen is released from her cage  or give them a few days before beginning treatment? Or should I just wait until I see signs of mites?

Whats the best stuff to use? 
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Joe D
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« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2013, 07:37:57 PM »

The guys in my local club tell when and what to use, they also say if you want to have bees you will treat.  So far I haven't treated for mites,ever.  I do treat for SHB's.  It is up to you whether you do or don't treat.  You should get a good response, weigh them and decide for your self.  Beek that treat and those that don't both loose bees.  Those that do treat will say they don't loose near as many.   Good luck





Joe
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capt44
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« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2013, 06:43:29 PM »

I test for Varroa Mites in August and Treat in September when the temps cool down below 90degrees F.
I keep forage for the bees such as Buckwheat and in October I'm feeding sugar syrup with pro health at 2-1.
When it turns cold I stay out of my hives until mid Feburary.
If the hive is weak I will feed 2-1 sugar syrup with pro health and when it turns cold I will put fondant candy on the bees.
When I feed the syrup I give them Fumilgin B as a preventative for Nosema.
So far I have not had to treat for Varroa Mites in the spring.
But I have to monitor the Small Hive Beetles close, they're worse this year than I've ever seen them.
I'm in North Central Arkansas Zone 7
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Richard Vardaman (capt44)
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2013, 08:02:43 PM »

The first question is, what is the person you are buying your bees from using. The other question is what size foundation are you going to use, are you going to use natural foundation.
If they don't treat then you probably won't need to either especially if you are using natural comb or at least small cell foundation.
I recommend reading The practical Beekeeper Beekeeping Naturally by Michael Bush. My wife bought it for me for Christmas, just started reading it and and it covers this topic very well.
Jim
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Jim 134
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2013, 10:33:49 PM »

When should you start mite treatmeant? Im a starting some new hives in April. I am starting out with package Bees. I don't want to depend on chemicals all the time but understand the V Mites need to be dealt with.
Should I treat my hives for mites as soon as the queen is released from her cage  or give them a few days before beginning treatment? Or should I just wait until I see signs of mites?

Whats the best stuff to use? 

The if you are buying package bees they will most likely (A 98% they) have been treated for Varroa Mites before you get them. I would start testing in August for Varroa Mites.




                    BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2013, 06:51:00 AM »

The last time I treated for Varroa mites in ANY of my hives was 2003.  The last time I treated for Varroa in all my hives was 2001.  There are alternatives...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2013, 07:23:08 AM »

The last time I treated for Varroa mites in ANY of my hives was 2003.  The last time I treated for Varroa in all my hives was 2001.  There are alternatives...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfoursimplesteps.htm
http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm

Michael,
How was your vacation in PA/NJ area? My father in law, Lou, said you were in the area and did a talk for his bee club. He is the new president, this year,  for that club. He really enjoyed your presentation. We sent him your book for Christmas. I recommend your book to my wife for his Christmas gift, not knowing he had met you.
Jim
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merince
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« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2013, 01:57:17 PM »

Starting with a new package and equipment, you probably don't need to treat until after the main flow, when brood rearing starts to peter out and the mite loads start to climb. If you have any beekeeping buddies/mentors near you, they can give you a pretty good idea when that happens.

I would test first, and treat only if the v mites are above a reasonable threshold. Randy Oliver has a great resource on testing and treating for mites:

http://scientificbeekeeping.com/varroa-management/
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kathyp
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« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2013, 04:19:56 PM »

sometimes when has to do with what.  some treatments are very temp dependent, so make sure you are familiar with that info before you buy something. 

if you want to stay as close to natural as you can, i can recommend Apiguard, but it is one that needs the warmer temps (+60) and takes  4 weeks (one brood cycle) to treat.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2014, 02:59:02 PM »

>How was your vacation in PA/NJ area?

Great!
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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