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Author Topic: Pollen Patties/fumgil  (Read 417 times)
GSF
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« on: December 20, 2013, 08:57:14 PM »

I'm going to ask a question with an obvious answer - I think. I went back through some of the yt beehealth videos from the University of Ga back in the 80's Keith Deplanie (sp). These brought up a couple of questions.

First, yesterday was my rotating day off. When it got pretty warm I walked over to look at the bees. If I didn't know any better I'd say it was spring. They were bringing red and yellow pollen to beat the band. This isn't the first time this winter either. Since the gr started/stopped blooming they have slowed down a good bit but they haven stopped bringing in pollen. One of the videos mentioned making some pollen patties and feeding it to the bees. I'm under the impression that's not necessary, suggestions? I'm beginning to wonder if they are robbing a hive somewhere.

Next, Fumgil B was mentioned. I got the impression from them that it was necessary for a preventive measure against nosema. I got a suggestion from someone else that if they weren't sick - don't treat. FBM said something also on a video along these lines; "If you take medicine all the time you just ain't gonna feel like doing much - and the bees are the same way." The folks I got my bees from mentions always using it in their pamphlet. I want to do as little or no treatments as possible but I only have had one hive since last June and I don't want to loose it either. How do you approach this?
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John Wayne
rwlaw
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« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2013, 06:55:18 AM »

Heard from a bk down in lower FL that he's got maple pollen coming in, but your way north, maybe you never really had a killer frost & some plants are doing a second blossoming.
 IMO, it's too early for pollen parties down there, they're for stimulating brood rearing,  it isn't even the winter solstice yet and you still can get a cold snap or two. I'm sure somebody down in your neighborhood will be online sooner or later.
 Here's my 2cents on fumagilin, it's a treatment and I don't treat unless I'm absolute 100% certain that it's necessary.
 I just saw a news blip on chicken having 6 different strains of bacteria that are restistant to antibiotics, they figure that it's because of the antibiotics that they are given as a preventative measure, that certainly sounds like a treatment merry go round to me!


 
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GSF
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« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2013, 06:57:53 AM »

Thanks for the reply. We've had a lot of killer frosts and several nights in the twenties.
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

John Wayne
rwlaw
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« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2013, 08:00:08 AM »

 You must have some protected plants in their flight area got greenhouses in your area maybe?
 I've never seen bees rob pollen out of frames that I've set out to be cleaned up, besides it seems like it'd be crumbs and they wouldn't be able to pack it in their pollen baskets, but I'll stand ready to be whuped w/ the education stick grin
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chux
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« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2013, 08:48:59 AM »

We've had some freezing nights already in eastern NC too. For the last week or so we've had really warm weather. The girls are bringing in red pollen and yellowish pollen, as you describe. Lots of it. I'm not sure where they are getting it. Seems like there is a pollen chart on the internet somewhere. Hmmm. Not just local, then.
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MsCarol
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« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2013, 08:08:49 PM »

I am glad i am not the only one,

Winter Solstice. Temps hit 70° here today.

I swear the bees were decorating for Christmas as they were bringing in Christmas Red pollen - Bright red!!! There was a bit of golden pollen as well, but the bright red was a trip!!

Anyone have a clue what it might be here in southern middle TN/northern AL?Huh
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pgayle
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2013, 12:07:38 AM »

I remember from one of our bee club meetings hearing that fumagillin was less effective against nosema ceranae that against nosema apis.  In fact, using it can actually select for nosema ceranae, by killing the nosema apis.  Nosema ceranae may be the more harmful of the two.  What I took from that is that it's best to avoid using it. 

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #7 on: December 23, 2013, 07:23:29 PM »

I have never used fumidil in 40 years of beekeeping.  In most of the world it is illegal.  It is know to cause birth defects in mammals.  It also disrupts the bacteria in the gut of the bee that protects them from Nosema.  It also kills the yeasts that are required for fermenting pollen into bee bread (bees can't digest pollen).  Pollen substitute patties are not necessary and result in short lived bees.  In a fall dearth (we have long winters here) we need to have young, long lived bees in order to make it to spring and they may require pollen (not substitute) some years but not most years.
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Michael Bush
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10framer
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« Reply #8 on: December 23, 2013, 10:01:16 PM »

i'm with michael bush.  i've never used fumidil and i've never used pollen substitutes. 
i saw some bees bringing in red pollen in griffin, georgia back in january.  the maples will be blooming in about a month and the bees will start expanding the brood nests. 
the thing to watch will be honey stores from mid-february though march.  the maples will get the bees going then nothing really comes in until clover and hives that were borderline on stores can starve really fast during that little dearth.
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