Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
September 30, 2014, 07:14:45 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat(1)  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: entrance size  (Read 2229 times)
Brother Dave
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 97


Location: Shelton WA.


WWW
« on: November 21, 2013, 12:23:38 AM »

I have noticed watching JPs videos that bees tend to have small entrances. The entrance to a standard langstroth Hive is huge. I guess someone started this size entrance for a reason. Does anyone out there know why? I guess people must have thought bigger entrances would make a hive more productive.  Michael Bush shows shims used as entrances. I have been using them for my entrances they work well and look easier for the bees to defend. David
Logged

RayMarler
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 509


Location: Marysville, CA


« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2013, 02:33:16 AM »

I use a 3/4" beespace on my bottom boards instead of 3/8" and I've been cutting down the entrance size to 2" wide in the center of the bottom landing for the past couple of years. I'm like you, I think the bees like a smaller entrance, but that's just my thinking, nothing scientific about it. I do use 3/4" holes drilled into front face of the upper boxes on some, bees seem to like that. This year I used some bottom boards turned upside down as a top board and the bees seemed to like that a lot, so I may do more of those next year.
Logged

Sitting in the shade, drinking lemon aid.
Enjoying the breeze while counting the bees.
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13686


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2013, 06:53:31 AM »

When the bees choose they choose a small entrance.  But they can't really change it much (unless you have bees that don't have the propolis bred out of them).  It seems a bit more efficient to have it larger in a heavy flow.  But I have seen hives that I didn't remove or open the reducer and they seem to do as well or better than the ones with larger openings.  Anything taller than 3/8" is harder to defend against wax moths and yellow jackets.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
capt44
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 507


Location: Central Arkansas


WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2013, 12:20:32 PM »

I usually keep my entrances reduced to around 2 inches or so unless there is a robbing situation then I go for 1 inch or so.
Now on my 6 frame hives I build them 10 1/2 inches deep with a 1 1/4 inch hole for an entrance.
The bottom of the entrance is 1/2 inch off the bottom.
I got that design from Georgia Bees for small hive beetle control.
The bees don't seem to mind the small entrance and they can defend it better.
Logged

Richard Vardaman (capt44)
Brother Dave
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 97


Location: Shelton WA.


WWW
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2013, 05:17:51 PM »

I am thinking about redesigning my bottom boards to have an entrance about 1 bee tall and 8 bees wide. I have been using top entrances using roofing shims this year already and the bees seem to prefer those entrances.

Logged

Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6405


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2013, 08:57:39 PM »

Small entrances also eliminate having to deal with mice.
Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2013, 08:36:20 AM »

I also prefer small entrances and believe my bees do too.  They 'may' very well be inefficient during heavy flows, they do get quite crowded. 

My bottoms are left open at roughly 3.5" with mouse guards on year round.  My tops are a 2.5" notched inner cover placed notch side down and reduced to a ha;f inch for winter with bottoms covered over with hay, allowing for minimal entry/exit for bees and breezes  Smiley.
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Leather Jim
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 73

Location: Homerville, Oh


« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2013, 09:32:48 PM »

I run a 3/8" x 6" during season and shut it down to 3/8" x 1" for winter.
Logged
bbbthingmaker
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 51

Location: Greers Ferry Lake , Arkansas


« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2013, 07:34:37 AM »

How about keeping the regular entrance small, then during a good flow open up a top entrance at the bottom of the super ?
Logged
Brother Dave
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 97


Location: Shelton WA.


WWW
« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2013, 01:07:55 PM »

I like that idea also. I am trying to lower the chance of mice getting in (they really like bottom entrances.)


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
Logged

jredburn
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 113

Location: SW Florida


WWW
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2013, 07:00:52 PM »

A few month back there was an article in Bee Culture about entrance size, location and queen excluders.
Somebody took 18 hives and split them into three groups, all  were 2 standard brood boxes and two supers.  First group of six; Full bottom opening and queen excluder on top of the brood, 
 of the brood box.
 Second group had a 3/4" dia hole opening at the top, queen excluder above the brood.
The third had a 3/4" round hole at the top, no queen excluder, no inner cover

All three sets were in the same general location.  The first set produced about 35 lbs/hive,  the second group produced  about 45lb/hive and the third group produced close to 100lbs/hive.

Rev. Langstroth lived in a time when there was no such thing as central air.  All the houses had porches,  lots of windows and doors at porch level, an attic and a pitched roof.  So when he designed his bee houses, he put in a porch with lots of entranceway (for ventilation) down at the porch level and an attic floor over the whole thing.    About the only things he got right were movable frames and bee space.  (Pretty important things too).  But bees don't like porches with big entrances and queens don't need or want excluders.  If you insist on having them in your boxes then you are going to pay a price in reduced honey production an probably reduced longevity. Regards
Joe
Logged
dirt road
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24

Location: Southern Idaho


« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2013, 07:24:52 PM »

jredburn; is there any chance you could give a few more details on the article? Maybe what issue of the magazine, or better yet the name of the researcher? I have felt for some time that the wide deep entrances were not as beneficial as some think. Last year I scaled them down to 3/4 x 3 inches for the summer, and 3/8 x 1 for the winter with a 5/8" hole at the top for ventilation during the winter. I tried  a couple at 3/8 x 3" this summer, and have been thinking I might go to that for all of them, though haven't made up my mind yet.
Logged
Vance G
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1124

Location: Great Falls,Montana


« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2013, 08:56:03 PM »

My bottom boards are of a migratory pattern before pallets and the entrance is the width of the box and between 1/4 and 5/16" deep.  Most of the year I have most of that blocked off.  It slows down mice enough that the bees get there if they try to enlarge it to get in.  When I wrap for the winter, I close it completely and the bees use a bored hole below the handhold in the upper brood box
Logged
10framer
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1509

Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2013, 12:23:12 PM »

A few month back there was an article in Bee Culture about entrance size, location and queen excluders.
Somebody took 18 hives and split them into three groups, all  were 2 standard brood boxes and two supers.  First group of six; Full bottom opening and queen excluder on top of the brood, 
 of the brood box.
 Second group had a 3/4" dia hole opening at the top, queen excluder above the brood.
The third had a 3/4" round hole at the top, no queen excluder, no inner cover

All three sets were in the same general location.  The first set produced about 35 lbs/hive,  the second group produced  about 45lb/hive and the third group produced close to 100lbs/hive.

Rev. Langstroth lived in a time when there was no such thing as central air.  All the houses had porches,  lots of windows and doors at porch level, an attic and a pitched roof.  So when he designed his bee houses, he put in a porch with lots of entranceway (for ventilation) down at the porch level and an attic floor over the whole thing.    About the only things he got right were movable frames and bee space.  (Pretty important things too).  But bees don't like porches with big entrances and queens don't need or want excluders.  If you insist on having them in your boxes then you are going to pay a price in reduced honey production an probably reduced longevity. Regards
Joe

that's an awfully small sample.  if it were 180 hives or 1800 hives it would be a lot more credible. 
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.548 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page September 18, 2014, 02:54:09 AM
anything