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Author Topic: OUCH!  (Read 1399 times)
OldMech
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« on: November 12, 2013, 12:45:58 PM »



 OK.. you guys making your own stuff.. be safe!!!

   I knew my table saw blade was getting dull.. but.. I try to milk them all I can.. and i paid this time...
   Cutting the 45's in top bars.. using OLD dry wood... all was going well, until the piece I was sliding through shattered....

   A six inch sliver blew back and SPEARED me through the finger...  At first. I didnt realize exactly what had happened.. I finished pulling the top bar through with my left hand.. then looked at my right hand... to see that big ol sliver sticking through my finger tip...
   Aww. swell.. I grabbed it to pull it out... and very....  VERY nearly peed...
   I ended up using a set of sidecutters to cut the skin over the sliver and gently lifting it out... then I sat on the floor with my head between my knees until the cold sweat stopped...   Wrapped it up and immediately put a new blade in the saw...

   

   You know you have to do it.. so just do it!!!  The scary thing is.. that sliver COULD have gone through my hand, arm etc...  Fortunately, its only a finger thats buggered for a few days....
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
sawdstmakr
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« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2013, 11:10:00 PM »

Wow. I am glad you are OK. I have been using table saws a long time. Never expected them to splinter wood into you. 30 years ago I saw a video of a table saw grabbing a long, narrow board and driving it into a man's stomach. After that I never stand in line with the saw blade.
Jim
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OldMech
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2013, 11:54:08 PM »

Aye... I knew the blade was getting grabby but it wasnt dull enough to smoke the wood yet. It was just the combination of old dry wood and dull blade i think.. Blade grabbed, wood splintered, I screamed like a girl.. well, not really, but only because it happened to fast   embarassed
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
itsme
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2013, 04:07:07 PM »

There are other dangers too.  This past summer I was sawing some rough cedar lumber when I felt something really zing into my arm.  The blade had run into an old piece of hardware (fencing or nail?) and threw that thing into me at pretty high speed.  The wound looked like a knife injury.  I still have a scar and probably always will.

I started wearing safety glasses again.  It was a good reminder for me.
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OldMech
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« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2013, 09:49:26 AM »

Yeah, good point itsme..
  the old boards I am currently using are filled with nails, but i do spend quite a bit of time removing them.. OLD boards are ACTUALLY 1 inch wide, so i have to plane them... in order to preserve the blades in my planer I make sure theres no metal left.. A stud finder works pretty good for that, but missing one is always possible.
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
Vance G
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« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2013, 10:42:57 AM »

I can buy a serviceable frame for 55 cents.  Now tell me again why I am risking rack and ruin making them?  But then, I do things just because I have time on my hands too. 
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itsme
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« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2013, 11:20:47 AM »

Yeah, good point itsme..
  the old boards I am currently using are filled with nails, but i do spend quite a bit of time removing them.. OLD boards are ACTUALLY 1 inch wide, so i have to plane them... in order to preserve the blades in my planer I make sure theres no metal left.. A stud finder works pretty good for that, but missing one is always possible.

The boards I was using were straight from the mill.  No matter what lumber you're using there is always a chance that there will be some metal in it from old forgotten fencing that the tree grew around so now the metal is actually inside the wood, not visible from the surface.

As to why I take risks...  Life seems to have some of those.  I have been around construction for a long time and find that most of the time if I pay attention to everything, I'll be fine.  There are freak accidents though, so no guarantees.  A guy has to make his own choices about these things.  I'll continue using my saws.

Speaking of saw safety, have you all seen the "Saw Stop"?  It's actually been out for quite a few years now and I've still never seen one in person.  If you're interested, a quick search will take you to a video that's pretty interesting.
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minz
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« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2013, 04:02:48 PM »

Seen the saw stop in action in Portland last year. 
We also have one here at work.  They guys that use it tell me a couple of things to keep in mind: Wet wood (like new pressure treated) will set it off. If you are cutting metal you have to take the say apart and clean it all up before turning the safety feature back on.  Have an extra blade and stop available. If it goes off in the middle of the project you are done until you get new parts.
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Poor decisions make the best stories.
OldMech
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« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2013, 11:21:19 PM »

I can buy a serviceable frame for 55 cents.  Now tell me again why I am risking rack and ruin making them?  But then, I do things just because I have time on my hands too. 

  thats a good point.. I cant get them that cheap.. be about a dollar each here.. so.. after making about 1200 frames.. i claim it to be a 1200 dollar injury... makes me feel better so hush!   I actually think i did more damage with the sidecutters than the wood sliver did.. but it was one of those things.. I wanted it OUT!!!!! and that nasty splintery would was having NOTHING to do with getting pulled out...  at least while I was awake and still had to pee....
  Dad always told me, if your going to be dumb, you have to be tuff
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
Bee-Mover
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« Reply #9 on: November 30, 2013, 06:38:31 AM »

Yikes!! shocked

I'm glad you're alright!  Lets all keep a healthy respect for power tools!
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