Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 18, 2014, 11:50:59 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Different type of frame feeder  (Read 960 times)
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1095


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« on: November 05, 2013, 01:40:30 AM »

A while back yard there was a thread that mentioned using drawn comb filled with syrup as a feeder. I found a product called Honey Super Cell which is fully drawn plastic frames. I'm thinking of using one frame in a mating nuc as a feeder. I'm thinking mix heavy syrup plus mega bee and brush it on to fill the cells.
No drowning,  easy access and no concerns with SHB or moths. Anybody see a down side?
Logged

Later,
Ray
Great Lakes Bees
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2

Location: Spring Lake, MI


WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2013, 06:08:07 AM »

I remember that as well but couldn't find it. I saw someone do that with fondant. I think what he did was use older stiffer comb and smear it on. I think your super cell idea might be a good one. Keep us posted.
Logged
10framer
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1570

Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2013, 08:35:40 AM »

i've done it with old comb when i was in a pinch.  i use division board feeders with floats in them and the interior walls are rough.  the bees can climb out.  we used to just put some screen into the feeders so they could climb out.  division board feeders aren't as bad as people make them out to be.  my biggest concern is that they give hive beetles somewhere to hide when they aren't in use.
Logged
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6435


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2013, 08:54:20 AM »

I have quite a bit of the HSC,   and although I have only used it to feed syrup on occasion,  I do use it to provide water to bees during cut outs on hot days.    I will fill it with some water and place it in the bee vac before I start.

The drawback I see is that it is hard to fill the cells (get air bound) without making a mess.  If you don't keep it vertical when filling, some of the backside will drain out while filling the top side.   Spilling is not a big issue when I use water,  but syrup becomes a bit sticky.

The other thing with HSC is the frame edges are great hiding places for SHB.  So if beetles are a problem for you, you will want to fill in the gaps.

Kelley use to sell (maybe still does?) a machine for filling comb frames.  It was basically a bunch of nozzles that sprayed syrup.  Two rows of these nozzles would spray at each other.   You would hold the frame by the tabs and "dip" it down in the slot and then pull it back up.   Both sides would be filled at the same time.

Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


MsCarol
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 135

Location: Southern Middle TN


« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2013, 09:10:38 AM »

Somewhere in my travels I read of someone using one of those squeeze type condiment bottles like used to be seen in diners for ketchup or mustard to squirt the syrup onto/into the cells of a frame. But I can see the issue of drippy sticky syrup leaking out of the off side while filling.

But good on the use of the Super Honey cell frames.
Logged
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1095


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2013, 09:56:28 AM »

Rob,
The SHB problem is part of the worry with the division board feeder. My main concern is drowning. Not counting the feeder frame, I want the nucs to be 3 med frames with about a pint of bees. I'm going to build 30 nucs with limited resources so I gotta be frugal. It's not money I'm talking about it's bees and drawn comb. I'm going to populate with 1 frame sealed brood,  1 frame pollen/honey and 1 foundationless frame. I'm going to try to rob the frames from my existing 14 hives w/o weakening them to much as part of the "opening the brood nest" swarm prevention manipulation. 
It only sounds feasible when I factor in purchasing 6-5lb packages to augment my resources.
I'm wanting to raise enough queens to support splits after the flow and requeen all at the same time.
Realistically speaking I may not succeed but you gave to set goals.
Logged

Later,
Ray
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1095


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2013, 10:01:10 AM »

Robo,
Do you think a sprayer could fill the cells? Set it to a coarse stream and fill one side at a time? Over a #2 wash tub or something similar?
Logged

Later,
Ray
Robo
Technical
Administrator
Galactic Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6435


Location: Scenic Catskill Mountains - NY

Beekeep On!


WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2013, 10:12:49 AM »

Have you considered sugar frames?  

http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/emergency-feeding/


If your going to make 30 nucs,  I would advice trying multiple methods to see which works best.   Would hate to see you loose a large portion to any one method that you haven't proved.

Logged

"Opportunity is missed by most people because it comes dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison


10framer
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1570

Location: Butler,GA


« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2013, 11:40:07 AM »

why not just pour granulated sugar into drawn comb or the super cell frames you were asking about?  seems like you could fill one side, cover it with plastic wrap then fill the other side, take the plastic off and put it in the hive.  honestly, anything other than division board feeders becomes pretty time consuming and labor intensive when you reach your 200 colony goal. 
we had a drum that we pressurized with an air can and a hose with a nozzle like on a gas pump.   if all your feeders are on the same side you just crack the hive open, slide the back to one side and pour the syrup in then close it up.
we could feed hundreds of hives in a day.
Logged
tecumseh
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 391

Location: College Station, Tx


« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2013, 05:34:54 AM »

a snip...
Honey Super Cell

another snip...
Do you think a sprayer could fill the cells?

tecumseh...
amazing where you can run across a good idea.  recently I was clearing out a shed and ran across several boxes of honey super cell and 'your idea' would at least be something to try with the stuff.  I was just this far from tossing it all in the dumpster.

getting somewhat to very think syrup to flow thru a sprayer would present some significant problems.  perhaps 40 years ago or so Kelley had a device (essentially a tight metal box equipped with a pump) that they sold for doing just what you seem to want to do.  if I had small numbers of comb to fill I would likely first use a sqegee, a flat pan and a squeeze bottle. 
Logged

I am 'the panther that passes in the night'... tecumseh.
RHBee
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1095


Location: Pinopolis, SC

That's my pooch.


« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2013, 07:47:05 AM »

why not just pour granulated sugar into drawn comb or the super cell frames you were asking about?  seems like you could fill one side, cover it with plastic wrap then fill the other side, take the plastic off and put it in the hive.  honestly, anything other than division board feeders becomes pretty time consuming and labor intensive when you reach your 200 colony goal. 
we had a drum that we pressurized with an air can and a hose with a nozzle like on a gas pump.   if all your feeders are on the same side you just crack the hive open, slide the back to one side and pour the syrup in then close it up.
we could feed hundreds of hives in a day.


Rob, I plan to do this in spring. I really don't care for any of the division board feeder designs commercially available. They just take up more room than I want them to. I thought about top jar feeding but you have to add additional space above to cover it. If I implement the HSC feeder system, I would have prefilled units and simply open the nuc and swap them out. This would only be in my mating yard.

As far as granulated sugar goes, I guess that could be done. Pack the HSC with sugar then moisten. Can the bees process this as well as syrup?
 
My full sized hives are fed with inverted buckets, 2 1/2qts, I put an extra super on top to make them weather proof. To change I slide a piece of thin sheet metal under the feeder to contain the bees, change the feeder and slide the sheet metal out. Quick, easy and no flying bees.

a snip...
Honey Super Cell

another snip...
Do you think a sprayer could fill the cells?

tecumseh...
amazing where you can run across a good idea.  recently I was clearing out a shed and ran across several boxes of honey super cell and 'your idea' would at least be something to try with the stuff.  I was just this far from tossing it all in the dumpster.

getting somewhat to very think syrup to flow thru a sprayer would present some significant problems.  perhaps 40 years ago or so Kelley had a device (essentially a tight metal box equipped with a pump) that they sold for doing just what you seem to want to do.  if I had small numbers of comb to fill I would likely first use a sqegee, a flat pan and a squeeze bottle. 


To battle fire ants I found a cheap sprayer with a metal wand. I cut the wand at an angle like a hypodermic needle. I would pump up the sprayer, jab the wand into the center of the mound, squeeze the handle and withdraw the wand. Very effective.
In this application, I will try the same kind of sprayer but this time flatten the wand so that it has a fan like pattern. Much like Rob's method for filling the division board feeders I'm hoping the syrup flows well. Hopefully the HSC has the upward sloping cell configuration to retain the liquid.

Have you considered sugar frames? 

http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/beekeeping/emergency-feeding/


If your going to make 30 nucs,  I would advice trying multiple methods to see which works best.   Would hate to see you loose a large portion to any one method that you haven't proved.


 

Thanks Robo, I'm kinda one of those "all in" types. You know, come up with a plan then do what is needed to make it work. A little reality check goes a long way.

This is all just me throwing out ideas right now. Making things work and coming up with solutions for problems is kinda what I do for a living. Group discussions share concepts and help me see different perspectives. I haven't even cut the first board to build the nucs yet and thanks to this open exchange the final build is still being fine tuned.

I really appreciate the feedback and discussions.
Logged

Later,
Ray
my-smokepole
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 82

Location: Toledo,Ohio


« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2013, 09:16:42 AM »

About a year ago they was a thread on Bee source. where they made a frame Surup filler tank. Basically a tank with PC pipe with fine holes in it with a Surup pump supplying the pressure
Logged

My-smokepole
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.249 seconds with 21 queries.

Google visited last this page December 17, 2014, 05:52:12 PM