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Author Topic: Ventilation and frame spacing.  (Read 853 times)
Royall
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« on: November 04, 2013, 12:04:57 PM »

I was looking at people working with bees on YouTube. In this video
New Beekeeper - What to do now
]http://www.youtubecom/watch?v=_GT71c8QkDY @ 5:15 the man said to be sure and allow a space at the top of the hive for ventilation. I thought this would be a place for SHB to get into the hive or a place for them to hide. This is the first time I've heard mention of this. Other thing in the video, is towards the end (7:28). He is using a couple of homemade spacer tools to make sure the frames are all evenly spaced across the hive. This too is something I've not seen before.

I realize as I read through prior posts on this forum and watch videos on YouTube that there are just as many ways to work with bees as there are Beeks. I'm just hoping to work into good habits right from the start.

BTW.. I wasn't sure about posting video links into the post here so I left the (.) out between youtube and com so the keep the video from posting here. I felt it took up too much space here. Be sure to correct the link if you cut and paste the url.

Thanks everybody for helping me out!!
« Last Edit: November 04, 2013, 01:35:40 PM by Robo » Logged
Robo
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« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2013, 01:37:30 PM »

You can post Youtube links,  it is OK.    Infact the forum software will recognise the link (no need to put special code around it) and automatically load the video.    It is just a link that is loaded when viewed so it does not take any space on our server.
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Robo
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« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2013, 01:52:40 PM »

You can use self spacing frame rests or buy a tool to space frames if you don't want to use the frame rest spacers (ie.  want to start with 10 frames and once the comb is drawn go to 9 frames)

http://www.mannlakeltd.com/beekeeping-supplies/category/page67.html

You can also make a tool from frames rest spacers -> http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/frame-spacing-tool/
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merince
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« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2013, 02:23:13 PM »

Royall,

ventilation is important in a bee hive. During a flow, proper ventillation allows the bees to cure the nectar faster. You are right, that some of the spaces can become SHB hiding spots.

I usually provide extra ventillation by providing an upper entrance (I also have bottom entrances). In this way, the bees guard it and it is not a hole for the SHB to infiltrate the hive.
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danno
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« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2013, 03:41:46 PM »

The frame spacing tools in the video are unnessesary.  He had ten frames in that hive body and the end bars on the frames space them for you. No need for a tool.    I run 9 frame honey supers and use two frame spaces for them.    I do not use the 9 or 8 frame rabbit spacers because once installed you dont have any options but to use the number of frames they are made for.   
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Royall
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« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2013, 11:56:44 AM »

what is the purpose of running only 9 frames in a 10 frame box? I would have thought that it would promote the bees to make a burr.
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« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2013, 12:23:14 PM »

In a honey super, the bees will draw out the comb deeper. It makes the comb easier to uncap and extract.
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« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2013, 01:22:45 PM »

The way most do it is start with 10 frames the first season. Even with 10 they still will most likely make some wonky comb.  The second season you can reduce down to 8 or 9 evenly spaced frames.   After the extraction season I put 7 of the extracted frames back in the super and add 2 new frames of foundation.  The bee's will draw these 2 out most of the time the following season.
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Royall
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« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2013, 01:33:54 PM »

I think I need an aspirin!! LOL There is soooo very much to learn about bees. Just hope I don't screw up with them!! I do watch many videos on YouTube and see some conflicting things but on the most part a great learning tool. Just glad you guys are here to help out. One question I have tho.... While watching a vid talking about how queen excluders are not good and cut down honey production. That part made sense but then the statement that a few people made was, "add an entrance at the top of the hive for the field bees to go directly into the honey super"... Is this a good practice? To my way of thinking, it just makes another entrance that SHB can get in and take more bees to guard. Any comments?
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Robo
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« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2013, 01:44:41 PM »

Is this a good practice?

Like everything else,  it depends on what you are after.  Although top entrances allow the field bees easier access to the honey supers,  it also allows for much more foot traffic across the comb, which in turn makes it dirty, which is no advantageous for cut comb honey.    You will also get more pollen being stored with the honey which can be considered good or bad huh
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charlie b
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« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2013, 02:14:31 PM »

I was thinking of adding 1 or 2 ......7/8 in holes in my honey supers for direct access also. I will be after as much honey as possible as I want the bees to have ample honey for over wintering. I don't plan on doing cut combs, just bulk honey for locals and more for my bees. I'm after raising bees for sale, not honey, so my question  would be is the hole in the supers going to give me more honey?
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Robo
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« Reply #11 on: November 05, 2013, 02:58:54 PM »

I was thinking of adding 1 or 2 ......7/8 in holes in my honey supers for direct access also. I will be after as much honey as possible as I want the bees to have ample honey for over wintering. I don't plan on doing cut combs, just bulk honey for locals and more for my bees. I'm after raising bees for sale, not honey, so my question  would be is the hole in the supers going to give me more honey?

My experience has been, unlike a consistent upper entrance, holes in the supers will get very little traffic. 
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charlie b
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« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2013, 03:38:58 PM »

Robo. What do you mean by a consistent upper entrance?
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Robo
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« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2013, 03:51:02 PM »

Robo. What do you mean by a consistent upper entrance?

Always there, not just when supers are on.
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