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Author Topic: Honey Extractor  (Read 1457 times)
GSF
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« on: October 29, 2013, 07:28:40 AM »

This question would probably fall along the lines of what is the best bee. However, I'm looking towards spring and I want to purchase a honey extractor. Probably a manual one because of the price. A 2 or 4 frame one would probably be fine. What would you recommend as far durability? Or what do you use and how has it held up? Thanks
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D Coates
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2013, 09:29:08 AM »

I bought a 2nd-hand manual reversible 2-frame Kelly as I didn't know how addictive beekeeping is.  It worked like a champ until I got too big for it at 5 hives.  Sold it for what I paid for it.  It was rock solid and the design doesn't appear to have changed ($860 new).  Upgraded a couple years ago to a used electric 20 frame (36 if they're supers) Dadant that I completely refurbished.  Now that's a time saver!
« Last Edit: October 30, 2013, 02:27:09 PM by D Coates » Logged

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Moots
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2013, 09:31:22 AM »

GSF,
Not sure of your particular situation....# of hives, plans of expansion?, etc. etc.

I jumped straight to the Maxant 9 frame motorized, because I figured I'd end up there anyway, so I just bit the bullet and went for it.  grin

However, it looks like the tank is the same on the 2 hand crank model, which with a basket upgrade you can make a 9 frame crank...and even convert to the motorized option if desired.  Not sure how much money you leave abandoned on the side of the road stepping through those options.  huh

LINK TO MAXANT EXTRACTORS!

Anyway, this extractor is made in the good ole USA and from what I understand, one of the big advantages are that you can always get parts when needed.  I've only used mine twice, summer harvest in early August (10 - 8 frame mediums) and fall harvest this past weekend (3 - 8 frame mediums).  So far, I've been very pleased with the extractor.

Good luck!
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merince
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2013, 11:39:29 AM »

You definitely need to look into what your future plans are. You can outgrow your extractor fairly quickly if you really get into the hobby. On the other hand, many other beekeepers outgrew theirs, too, so you can score some deals on second hand ones.

For me, I went with the 9/18 motorized model from MannLake. Too many shoulder and wrist injuries in the family to tempt fate with a hand crank.
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RHBee
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2013, 03:23:01 PM »

Gary,
To me this was a question of time, money and expansion. Where do you want to be in the future, how much time do you want to spend extracting and finally how much do you want to spend.
Right or wrong, I chose one from Brushy Mountain. It will extract 21 mediums or I think 9 deeps. The extractor has a DC motor and is powered by a small drive. It does the job for now.
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Ray
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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2013, 11:20:26 AM »

Everything depends on performance. For little or small apiaries (near 30 hives) I would recommend mechanical 3-frame extractor made from stainless steel. Great machine! Lightweight, comfortable and fast. I have used it for years and fully enjoy it.

Do you consider extractors with electrical gear? 
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2013, 01:09:59 PM »

You definitely need to look into what your future plans are. You can outgrow your extractor fairly quickly if you really get into the hobby. On the other hand, many other beekeepers outgrew theirs, too, so you can score some deals on second hand ones.

For me, I went with the 9/18 motorized model from MannLake. Too many shoulder and wrist injuries in the family to tempt fate with a hand crank.

GSF,
I with Merince. On my first extract I went over JohnG's place and extracted 30 frames. He had a small motorized extractor (not a radial) and it took a long time. This year I processed 1100 pounds and I am really glad that I have my 9/18 Mann Lake motorized extractor.
Jim
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GSF
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« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2013, 07:47:47 PM »

Hey all, I appreciate your experience and comments. I'm not sure but I think I will probably go up to around 10 hives (or more). I'm afraid of having more than I can handle. I would like to have a yard full of bees but to give proper care to them I'll just have to take it one hive at a time. I will say no less than 5 hives.

I would like an extractor with the option of manual or electric. I figure one day the electrical grid will be hacked and it may take a while to get it back on.
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merince
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« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2013, 08:14:55 PM »

The MannLake ones definitely can be switched from manual to motorized with the add on motor. I recently saw that somebody mounted a bike to a radial extractor.

Here is a link to the picture: Picture of bike powered extractor

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RHBee
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« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2013, 09:40:16 PM »

Hey all, I appreciate your experience and comments. I'm not sure but I think I will probably go up to around 10 hives (or more). I'm afraid of having more than I can handle. I would like to have a yard full of bees but to give proper care to them I'll just have to take it one hive at a time. I will say no less than 5 hives.

I would like an extractor with the option of manual or electric. I figure one day the electrical grid will be hacked and it may take a while to get it back on.

Gary,
Are you a prepper?
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Ray
Moots
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« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2013, 10:30:39 PM »

I would like an extractor with the option of manual or electric. I figure one day the electrical grid will be hacked and it may take a while to get it back on.

There's an answer for that...It's called a generator.  grin
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GSF
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« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2013, 05:33:52 AM »

RHBee <prepper> I don't and do consider myself a prepper. We are anticipating an economic upheaval as more and more countries pull away from the dollar as the world's reserve currency, and recently Japan/China will buy no more "additional" debt from the US. Now, "I think" Saudi Arabia is considering not using the US dollar solely to trade for oil?

We first started a few years back (before natgeo) being somewhat concerned with the Madrid earthquake fault lines/splinters that run through our county. The tectonic plates in the S.E. US are more solid than the west coast. They've had so many quakes out there the plates are broken up. Therefore when Madrid hits again instead of a couple of cities being effected it will be a large portion of the S.E. US.

In the seventies AL Power Company bought up hundreds and hundreds of acres to build a nuclear power plant up here on the lake (a mile or so away). They discovered multiple fault lines and didn't even break the ground on building. A decade or two later they came in again with more advanced machinery and found even more fault lines/splinters(?). I think they are looking at coal or natural gas. It's on hold now because of money and the demand isn't there.

I could go on and on but I just want to be prepared.

People around here bought up tons of guns and ammo recently. Instead of preparing for a ban it seem they were preparing for a war. I can go to flea markets and different places and just about guess who's prepping or not, and at times guess what stage they are at. Yesterday at a flea market/outdoor sell I talked with a seller who told me that someone had bought 12 boxes of medical supplies from him. I would say they are well prepared. Water, food, shelter, defense, and first aid. Then comes the books, cards, games, ect.

I meet a lot of preppers when I sell goats. The good thing about a goat around here is you can herd them in the winter and they can live off of the privy hedges and winter grasses. Not much meat on brush goats but if we had to we could use some for milk and some for meat.

In today's world being prepared is the smart way to go. If you are not prepared you're either ignorant (lack of knowledge) or stupid (the inability to use knowledge). If someone thinks that folks are going to sit around and starve while they eat then there's a rude awakening coming for them. Now that's a whole different subject.

Oh yeah everybody, thanks again for your advice about the extractors. (I guess I'm still on topic grin)
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John Wayne
RHBee
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« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2013, 06:56:01 AM »

I couldn't agree more. Chance favors the prepared.
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Ray
GSF
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« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2013, 08:23:49 PM »

Hey folks I just wanted to clarify. I'm not saying if you don't prep you're stupid. Look around, if you feel like you ought to then do it.

People work, get paid, pay bills, save and/or invest. I'm not losing a penny by having a few extra groceries around. It's much like money in the bank.

Thanks again for the great advice on extractors.
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Moots
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« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2013, 09:02:43 PM »


...In today's world being prepared is the smart way to go. If you are not prepared you're either ignorant (lack of knowledge) or stupid (the inability to use knowledge)...



...Hey folks I just wanted to clarify. I'm not saying if you don't prep you're stupid....


lau
GSF, 
Sure glad you "clarified" things...because it sure looked like that's what you were saying...  grin

Any closer to a decision on the extractor?  Keep us posted...
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GSF
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« Reply #15 on: November 01, 2013, 05:07:34 AM »

Yeah Moots, I got to thinking about it and thought that probably didn't come across like I wanted it to.

Still doing some reading on the extractors, thanks.
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o.molchanov
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« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2013, 06:13:34 AM »

Hey all, I appreciate your experience and comments. I'm not sure but I think I will probably go up to around 10 hives (or more). I'm afraid of having more than I can handle. I would like to have a yard full of bees but to give proper care to them I'll just have to take it one hive at a time. I will say no less than 5 hives.

I would like an extractor with the option of manual or electric. I figure one day the electrical grid will be hacked and it may take a while to get it back on.

Good way of thinking, I wish you the best!

Regarding honey extractor, in that case I highly recommend to start with 4-frames mechanical extractor. It will be enough till that time when you will reach 50-70 hives. Afterwards, you can think about something with electrical gear. I vote against 2-frames extractors because I had a very negative experience in the past connected with vibrations and destroying of wax.
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Moots
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« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2013, 06:40:44 AM »

Yeah Moots, I got to thinking about it and thought that probably didn't come across like I wanted it to.

Still doing some reading on the extractors, thanks.

GSF,
Perfectly understandable, we've all done it.  Smiley Just having a little fun with you, thanks for taking it in stride.  cheesy
I noticed that first post was at 04:30ish...those early morning post can be tricky,  I've made a few of those myself and later in the day wondered, exactly what was I thinking?  cheesy

As for for extractor issue.  I will offer one more piece of advice that hopefully will prove helpful.  This is my first year, the plan was to have 2 to 3 hives.  Well, next thing you know, I'm all in...loving the new hobby, catching swarms, getting swarm calls, doing a cut out or two, etc. etc.
By late summer i'm at 10 or 11 hives and actually end up pulling honey from 6 of them...10, 8 frame mediums of capped honey.

The point being, when I bought my 6/9 frame electric extractor, I thought it was overkill, more extractor than I would ever want or need.  While I love it, and it performed great during that extraction, and I'm sure me being a newbie slowed down the process more so than the extractor...It became obvious rather quickly that more extractor capacity sure would move the process along...

Point of my story....When it comes time for you to make your decision...If you find yourself torn between two options.  I'd suggest going with the larger capacity.  While your thought process might be telling you it's overkill and more extractor than you need, my limited experience is telling me that probably won't be the case.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2013, 08:17:36 AM by Moots » Logged

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GSF
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« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2013, 07:16:53 AM »

You're right, I'll probably go ahead and bite the bullet and get something I can grow into. I can also see me with a ton of bees by the end of next summer - I can also see me scratching my head wondering what went wrong.
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edward
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« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2013, 02:03:31 PM »

If you have a few hives and can afford it a six frame extractor is pleasent to use because they are not prone to vibrations and dancing across the floor.

It will eaven run smothly if you forget to fill all the baskets or have frames with a lot of pollen  grin


mvh Edward  tongue
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