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Author Topic: Help with a speech  (Read 1005 times)
achunter
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« on: October 22, 2013, 07:24:55 PM »

Hey everyone I am giving a 5 minute speech on things to remember when you see a swarm. I need to make it exigent to the class (Why they need to know). I was curious about the percentage of the population who has ever seen a swarm or had to deal with a swarm. What does everyone think?
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2013, 07:38:01 PM »

you mean things like "don't jump around and scream"? or are you looking to teach them how to catch a swarm?  little more info please.....
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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achunter
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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2013, 07:45:15 PM »

Simply to give them information on what to do if they see a swarm. Such as don't be afraid, stay calm, don't spray them, contact a beekeeper etc. etc. However, before I start the speech the professor requires that we present some reason as to why they should listen. Such as "20% of the general public will see a swarm at some point in there lives". Then I can say well thats "x" about of people in here. So I was looking for information on the actual percentage of people who will ever see a swarm, or even just general opinions based on what others have found, how many swarm calls people get a year etc. etc.
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RHBee
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« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2013, 08:22:05 PM »

"don't jump around and scream"?
LOL, I hope that the OP means stuff like, don't spray with raid (or any other pesticide), remain calm (cause they won't attack you), call local university extension office, call local authority's or call a beekeeper. Give accurate information, swarm size description (basketball, volleyball, softball), swarm location, height from ground, when did they show up or how long they have been there.
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Ray
iddee
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« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2013, 08:54:47 PM »

Reason for knowing?

Save the bees.

Get them hived before they move into a house.

Keeping folks in the area calm prevents stings.

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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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achunter
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2013, 09:41:29 PM »

Any input on what percentage of people encounter a swarm?
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RHBee
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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2013, 09:55:06 PM »

I can't find any data.  Wish I could. I retracted the Purdue university link. They advocated killing the bees as an option.
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Ray
achunter
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« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2013, 10:02:13 PM »

Link provides some good information, thank you
« Last Edit: October 22, 2013, 10:32:54 PM by achunter » Logged
RHBee
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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2013, 10:16:11 PM »

To Late. embarassed
I might as well put it back:

http://www.ppdl.purdue.edu/ppdl/weeklypics/6-13-11.html
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Ray
iddee
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« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2013, 10:19:11 PM »

"Any input on what percentage of people encounter a swarm?"

Everyone that ever sees a swarm, sees one for the first time. All need to know what to do when they are in the middle of 20,000 critters they have been taught to fear, whether they ever need to use it or not.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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deknow
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« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2013, 10:19:26 PM »

....I'd say make up a percentage (make sure it isn't a round or even number with at least one digit to the right of the decimal point) and then  attribute it to Einstein shocked.  Case closed, and no one will question it. pop

deknow
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achunter
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« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2013, 10:31:35 PM »

Yeah I read down through that article and was a little surprised that that was in there but the beginning is not bad, no worries. Ah Einstein, hes always a good go to guy Wink
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RHBee
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« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2013, 10:51:44 PM »

I guess if you have a loved one who is extremely allergic to bee stings or your not a beekeeper and they are setting up residence in the walls of your house the destruction of the colony might make sense.
I however don't look at that as a viable option. The article was written to educate the general population so it covers the subject in an objective manner.
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Ray
deknow
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« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2013, 11:33:40 PM »

I don't think this should be disseminated to the general public, but it is good for beekeepers (and emergency personal) to know this trick...I'm glad to find it posted by others so I don't  have to describe it.  This will make a swarm cluster just drop with no flying bees...and they will recover in 15 min or so.  I've never done this myself, but I've seen it done, and I know some urban bee removal folks that do carry a bit of fertilizer in the truck just in case.
http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?227531-Ammonium-Nitrate
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JP
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« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2013, 01:42:44 AM »

Any input on what percentage of people encounter a swarm?

Its likely you will not find an answer to this question unless you narrow it down geographically. The actual answer to your question though if I had to guess is likely much less than 20%, could be as little as 5%.

What to do?

Enjoy it in all its glory because you may never see one again unless of course you are a beek or bee removal specialist in an area with lots & lots of feral & domestic colonies, somewhere likely in one of the southern states like my own.

Swarms are beautiful to behold, quite noisy, not that different than some sort of electrical buzzing sound (no pun intended), usually very gentle, as long as you don't swat at them, which you should remind people not to do.

It all happens very quickly, as they pass overhead.

Best advice I can think of unless you are a beek or wannabe beek trying to catch the swarm is to simply take it all in. That's right, tell them they are not to be feared and to enjoy the experience!


...JP
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T Beek
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« Reply #15 on: October 23, 2013, 05:16:33 AM »

Many beekeepers rarely see swarms themselves, especially if they're on top of their game so......it is likely a very small percentage that see them. 

I didn't see or hear of any this year, last year was a diferent story, about half a dozen were reported in the area.......I don't think any were mine... Undecided

The main thing tell people when asking about swarms is "to have no fear" because swarms are generally non-aggressive as they have no nest to protect and depending on location and/or weather conditions just want to find a suitable space to move into.
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
achunter
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« Reply #16 on: October 25, 2013, 12:39:42 AM »

Got an "A" on my speech, thanks to all who gave me some input!
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JP
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« Reply #17 on: October 25, 2013, 03:44:27 AM »

Got an "A" on my speech, thanks to all who gave me some input!

Congratulations! Hope you have the opportunity to experience a swarm one day.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

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RHBee
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« Reply #18 on: October 25, 2013, 05:09:55 AM »

Got an "A" on my speech, thanks to all who gave me some input!

Good job! I hope your audience enjoyed the speach as much as the prof.
Public speaking has always been difficult for me. But, I've found that the more I prepare and the more I'm interested in the subject the easier it becomes.
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Ray
T Beek
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« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2013, 07:04:07 AM »

GOOD JOB!  Hope your audience left better informed....all you can hope for really.

I've had to present testimony and answer questions before a few Congressional Committees in DC when I was still working, talk about nervous.  Those Dudes (and that place) can be very intimidating.

I'd rather spend time w/ bees any day Wink
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
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