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Author Topic: inspection good or bad?  (Read 2740 times)
merince
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« Reply #60 on: October 25, 2013, 10:26:15 AM »



MERINCE -I agree and by the number of bees in May and the number now I'm sure they swarmed more that once. I'm convinced if he keeps going like this he will not stay in the hobby long. I don't mind helping and it makes me feel good to give him a hand and share what little I know (I remind him I'm just into this 2 years myself) I have 7 hives so I have to put a effort in learning. I pick up a little from ALMOST everyone.

First thing I learned (within 2 months) was every beek has a different way of beekeeping and passing it along. Some will take the aproach of: this is what I learned, this has worked for me or this did not work for me. another aproach: This is how to do in, what I do works, what he does will not work.

Both are saying the same thing, just different aproaches from different personalities with bees in different places and thats ok.


dan

Dan,

You are probably right - some people want a hive, for a lack of better word as an "yard ornament". In the past, before varroa, they were probably alright leaving them alone. However - as you have seen from personal experience - nowadays bees require a great deal of involvement to keep them thriving. So far he's been lucky. When his luck runs out, you may be the lucky recipient of his equipment  grin
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Jim 134
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« Reply #61 on: October 25, 2013, 10:44:28 AM »

IMHO this looks like a good place for all of us to reread these rules.
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,1614.0.html




                  BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
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10framer
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« Reply #62 on: October 25, 2013, 11:09:30 AM »

IMHO this looks like a good place for all of us to reread these rules.
http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,1614.0.html




                  BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley


and yet we see threads like this over and over with one or two common denominators. there are people that are definitely not here to help.  it's easier to just throw your hands up and walk away and hope that the o.p. get's his or her answer.
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Finski
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« Reply #63 on: October 25, 2013, 11:32:02 AM »

[quote author=T ,jbb
« Last Edit: October 25, 2013, 12:16:54 PM by Finski » Logged

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10framer
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« Reply #64 on: October 25, 2013, 11:34:12 AM »

No (known) Reindeer or domesticated Caribou around the Great Lakes Region,

Caribou and reindeer are very different animal. Caribou do not want that human is its master.
We have in FInland too original reindeers which are very wild and cannot nurse as reindeers


"A recent study on reindeer mtDNA (Rĝed et al. 2008) identified at least two separate and apparently independent reindeer domestication events, in eastern Russia and Fenno-Scandia (Norway, Sweden and Finland). Substantial interbreeding of wild and domestic animals in the past obscures DNA differentiation, but even so, the data continue to support at least two or three independent domestication events, probably within the past two or three thousand years.

 Social differences between reindeer populations show that domestic reindeer have an earlier breeding season, are smaller and have a less-strong urge to migrate than their wild relatives. While there are multiple subspecies (R. t. tarandus and R. t. fennicus), they are not necessarily divided between domestic and wild animals, the result of continued interbreeding between domesticated and wild animals, and the likelihood that domestication took place relatively recently."
and that's why you you should inspect your hives every day........wait aminute.
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Finski
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« Reply #65 on: October 25, 2013, 11:38:50 AM »


ökug

« Last Edit: October 25, 2013, 12:16:34 PM by Finski » Logged

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10framer
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« Reply #66 on: October 25, 2013, 11:53:40 AM »

and you do that based off of the differences in the breeding cycles of reindeer? 
it seems like this thread has gotten WAY off topic and become more about who is right all the time and who isn't.  it seems like it would have been shut down long ago.
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Finski
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« Reply #67 on: October 25, 2013, 12:13:01 PM »

and you do that based off of the differences in the breeding cycles of reindeer?  
it seems like this thread has gotten WAY off topic and become more about who is right all the time and who isn't.  it seems like it would have been shut down long ago.

What about newspapers, strawballs, thanksgiving day honeyballs, dry sugar to suck in 13 litre respiration water, do nothing to varroa, climate is different in different places, nothing is no cold as Michigan

Good heavens. Why don't you cry for stupidity?

You are not serious or are you? And same with Jim

You are there so totally smart...
..
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T Beek
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« Reply #68 on: October 25, 2013, 04:17:23 PM »

Reindeer are in fact domesticated Caribou.  They are virtually the same animal. 

Reindeer are 'force bred' or 'artificially bred' by breeders while Caribou breed naturally....when they want to  grin
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Finski
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« Reply #69 on: October 25, 2013, 04:41:39 PM »

.
Aaaamen


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latebee
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« Reply #70 on: January 01, 2014, 01:17:02 AM »

Happy New Year!  Hope all is well and your beekeeping endeavors are rewarding.
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