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Author Topic: sub zero sttarvation  (Read 943 times)

Offline sparky_192

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sub zero sttarvation
« on: October 21, 2013, 08:25:19 PM »
lost my post... anyone overwinter outside at mnus 40 F with honey that is prone to granulation
Sparky-192

Offline BlueBee

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2013, 01:38:51 AM »
Nope, -40F is brutal!  Thank God it doesn't get that cold in Michigan.

If I tried to keep bees outside in that kind of cold, I would definitely be using electric heating all winter long.

Offline JPinMO

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2013, 07:19:40 PM »
40 below??? My gracoius, sparky -- where are you?
Anyone who doesn't take truth seriously in small matters
cannot be trusted in large ones either. – Albert Einstein

Offline sparky_192

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2013, 08:55:06 AM »
 :roll: I am near Brandon Manitoba Canada and minus 40F (equal to minus 40C) is quite normal for a few weeks each winter. :bee: The bees get out for "cleansing flights" on warmer days. I have made insulating boxes of 1 1/2 inch styrofoam. This year our honey is from Canola which granulates quickly. Apparently the bees can suck the moisture out and leave the dry sugary stuff behind and then starve.
      My question: other than feeding sugar water or corn syrup, how can I keep them safe? What temp will keep honey from granulating? The upper brood box right now weighs 90 lbs. (40 Kg)
     :camp:

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2013, 09:03:50 PM »
I used to winter them in Western Nebraska where I saw it hit -40 on two different winters and it was -40 every night for more than a month once.  The bees did not do well that winter, but if it's only a week or so, they did about as well as they do at -20 F or so.  I also sat it hit that in Laramie and the bees survived.  I think all my fall honey has always crystallized...
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Offline derekm

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2013, 09:09:00 PM »
:roll: I am near Brandon Manitoba Canada and minus 40F (equal to minus 40C) is quite normal for a few weeks each winter. :bee: The bees get out for "cleansing flights" on warmer days. I have made insulating boxes of 1 1/2 inch styrofoam. This year our honey is from Canola which granulates quickly. Apparently the bees can suck the moisture out and leave the dry sugary stuff behind and then starve.
      My question: other than feeding sugar water or corn syrup, how can I keep them safe? What temp will keep honey from granulating? The upper brood box right now weighs 90 lbs. (40 Kg)
     :camp:

you need at least 3 inches of styrofoam to be good for -25c  for -40c look at 4.1/2 inches
and that level of temp difference needs the top airtight sealed inside and outside.
If they increased energy bill for your home by a factor of 4.5 would you consider that cruel? If so why are you doing that to your bees?

Offline Vance G

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2013, 04:59:08 PM »
I used to keep bees along the Canadian line not far from where you are.  I did not have to deal with canola honey then however.  I would suggest that you check out the Pederson apiaries.ca in alberta and frenchbeefarm.com right there in Manitoba.  They may have information for you.  Also Larry Dick at honeybeeworld.com is a retired commercial beek who maintains a site and would be a good one to ask as he once commercially pollinated canola.  I liked Brandon many years ago.  Used to go there every year to their Retriever Trial.

Offline iddee

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2013, 06:54:15 PM »
I do not have even sub zero weather, but I can tel you this.

The bees are dead long before "their" temp hits zero. The brood nest is close to 90 F. "32 C.".
They can bring the honey temp up enough to liquify it before eating it. They do not need to suck liquid from solidified honey.
"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Offline GSF

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Re: sub zero sttarvation
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2013, 08:38:52 PM »
...and welcome!
"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

John Wayne

 

anything