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Author Topic: Winter Preparations  (Read 2138 times)
Finski
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« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2013, 08:10:08 AM »

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Parksguyy . It is better if you find some experienced beekeeper from Ottawa ans reviele out what they do there.

If you are going to follow advices of this forum, you will loose you hiuves. It is very sure.

And do not pick those "reverse inner cover" stories. Inner covers are 20 different structures.

Sugar piles, straw balls  ...gooood heavens....
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T Beek
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« Reply #21 on: October 22, 2013, 08:23:17 AM »

 huh  Sorry but I have never mentioned inner cover reversals.  IMHO, If using them properly, there is only one way to place a notched inner cover and that is notch side DOWN.  Always Down. 

The notch facing up simply makes no sense.
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Finski
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« Reply #22 on: October 22, 2013, 10:09:05 AM »

huh  Sorry but I have never mentioned inner cover reversals. 

I have the same inner cover around the year. Insulation side up, and the wooden board down.

I have 9 mm wooden board box and in the box 5-7 cm insulation. Construction is so called breathing. It lets moisture go through the cover to the loft.
(foam plastic matress. It may be even saw flour...)
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tjc1
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« Reply #23 on: October 22, 2013, 09:42:24 PM »



1.  Keep that inner cover with notch facing DOWN all year.  Don't force bees to climb through the inner cover hole to access hive.  The notch facing down is the only correct position.



TBeek - it may not be the case with all inner covers, but my inner cover is not the same both sides - with the notch down, there is more 'head room' above the frames. I had the impression that if you leave it this way in the summer, the bees are likely to build bridge comb in that space and muck things up. I think the idea of this design is to give a little more ventilation space in the winter, with direct venting to the outside (as opposed to up through the inner cover and then out).
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T Beek
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« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2013, 04:42:06 AM »

This shouldn't be so complicated.  I'm only referencing "NOTCHED INNER COVERS" not any other kind of inner cover, there are several designs.  Some have flat sides (I got rid of mine), some already have notches, some are wood, some are poly...etc...

HOWEVER; If using a "notched" inner cover as a top entrance or vent opening the notched end should be DOWN.  Always DOWN.  By turning the notch up 'you' force bees to enter the hive through the center hole of the inner cover.  That serves no purpose.  In fact it kinda negates the purpose of an inner cover, no?

A little bur comb on the bottom of inner covers should be (is) expected, it doesn't bother me or my bees.  Regular inspections keep things from getting 'mucked' up Wink
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Finski
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« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2013, 07:16:38 AM »

Burr is normal in hives like Wheels under car
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merince
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« Reply #26 on: October 24, 2013, 10:12:31 AM »

Can someone tell me what this is ... I take it that its readily available at the lumber stores.  Its placed above the inner cover over the existing hole and is fiberous so it absorbs moisture.  I've also heard of older beeks using what we call black joe here.  Just looking for some guidance here from some more experienced beeks.
Thanks
    

Parksguyy,
There are a lot of ways to absorb moisture out of a hive. One of the simplest is to make a fondant or a candy board - the sugar will absorb the moisture. You can also look into making a quilt box. There are many designs, but essentially it is a super with mosquito screen on the bottom and filled with rags, wood chips or similar absorbing materials. One of the best explanations on how to make it is here: Quilt Box instructions

I know you asked specifically about how to get the moisture out. However, moisture kills bees when the water drips on the cluster. One way yo prevent that is to insulate the top. I put 1" pink foam above the inner cover. You can also slightly tip the hive forward and in this way the water droplets will run to the sides.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2013, 02:04:30 PM by eivindm » Logged

T Beek
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« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2013, 10:27:28 AM »

Dry sugar placed above the inner cover 2-4 " thick inside another box absorbs enough moisture during the winter to turn it into a near solid brick by Spring. 

Absorbant, Insulating Feed....all in one placement. 

Adding the above mention foam board above the sugar .......even better IMO.
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Finski
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« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2013, 01:24:26 PM »



Absorbant, Insulating Feed....all in one placement. 



And I have nothing like that and will never have.

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OldMech
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« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2013, 11:10:27 PM »

HOWEVER; If using a "notched" inner cover as a top entrance or vent opening the notched end should be DOWN.  Always DOWN.  By turning the notch up 'you' force bees to enter the hive through the center hole of the inner cover.  That serves no purpose.  In fact it kinda negates the purpose of an inner cover, no?

A little bur comb on the bottom of inner covers should be (is) expected, it doesn't bother me or my bees.  Regular inspections keep things from getting 'mucked' up Wink

   The bees dont need to use the "notch" as an entrance in the summer. Its only for a bit of ventilation. A small bit at that. Beekeeping for dummies told me the notch went up, so thats how I used them when I first started...  always wanted to find that book and see if it gave a reason...   
    I tried leaving mine notch down in the summer and usually had to pry the bejeesus out of the cover to get it off after three/four  weeks  so quickly reverted to notch up for the summer, notch down for the winter..   That does NOT mean its right, just what I do..

    Notch down in winter, on top of a two inch spacer.. newspaper and sugar on top of the frames to the back, leaving the front open about two inches from hive to where the paper starts. 2" foam on top of inner cover, and telescoping cover on top of the foam.. then a ratchet strap to hold it all together...   Doing it that way I dont feel any desperation set in if we dont get any 50 degree days until early march when I can inspect.   Depending on the hive.. sometimes the sugar is about gone, sometimes its barely been touched...   I consider it much like owning a gun..   Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.
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39 Hives and growing.  Havent found the end of the comfort zone yet.
Finski
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« Reply #30 on: October 25, 2013, 02:13:18 AM »

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Only what you need is to use your own branes...sometimes.  Guys really have their ideas more than one human life can stand.
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Jim 134
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« Reply #31 on: October 25, 2013, 02:40:34 AM »

There is enough"baiting" in both directions here. Play nicely or who knows where the axe may fall. The days are getting shorter and I have more time behind the keyboard. I will be sure I won't regret coming here, and winter is just heading our way!!

th_thumbsupup


I guess I am not the only one to see the two of you as a short time.


          


                    BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
« Last Edit: October 25, 2013, 03:13:22 AM by Jim 134 » Logged

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T Beek
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« Reply #32 on: October 25, 2013, 06:08:19 AM »

HOWEVER; If using a "notched" inner cover as a top entrance or vent opening the notched end should be DOWN.  Always DOWN.  By turning the notch up 'you' force bees to enter the hive through the center hole of the inner cover.  That serves no purpose.  In fact it kinda negates the purpose of an inner cover, no?

A little bur comb on the bottom of inner covers should be (is) expected, it doesn't bother me or my bees.  Regular inspections keep things from getting 'mucked' up Wink

   The bees dont need to use the "notch" as an entrance in the summer. Its only for a bit of ventilation. A small bit at that. Beekeeping for dummies told me the notch went up, so thats how I used them when I first started...  always wanted to find that book and see if it gave a reason...   
    I tried leaving mine notch down in the summer and usually had to pry the bejeesus out of the cover to get it off after three/four  weeks  so quickly reverted to notch up for the summer, notch down for the winter..   That does NOT mean its right, just what I do..

    Notch down in winter, on top of a two inch spacer.. newspaper and sugar on top of the frames to the back, leaving the front open about two inches from hive to where the paper starts. 2" foam on top of inner cover, and telescoping cover on top of the foam.. then a ratchet strap to hold it all together...   Doing it that way I dont feel any desperation set in if we dont get any 50 degree days until early march when I can inspect.   Depending on the hive.. sometimes the sugar is about gone, sometimes its barely been touched...   I consider it much like owning a gun..   Better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

Agreed;  Bees don't NEED a notched inner cover as an entrance.....but many Beeks use them, especially in Canada (where I learned of their use).   That said I've been using them for several years and whether they need them or not...they sure do use them..... 

I know this will roll some eyes but I typically have BOTH Top and Bottom entrances open at the same time, the top as already noted is just a notched inner cover (notch side down so as not to force bees to enter through inner cover hole).  I keep the bottom open at the smallest opening until a flow then open all the way.  My bees seem to enjoy having the choice to use the upper or lower entrance..... cool

Also Agreed;  Some years my bees have plenty of stores and never touch the dry sugar left for them, others will be licking it up by January despite both having similar weight in October  huh  Maybe some colonies have piggy bees  Undecided  Not so sure.........
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Finski
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« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2013, 06:51:54 AM »

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Nowadays in Europe many guys are using a new roof model. it is a thick polystyrene roof, which acts as inner cover and rain cover. It is one piece.
Than they use piece of plastic sheet between box and roof that burr does not glue the roof to frames.

Then guys insist that they are modern. And mesh floor is said to be modern...

But this "modernization" does not bring any honey to hives. Flowers make nectar as before and the yield will be the same.

Assembling the Bee Box - Part 2
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