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Author Topic: Them Apples!  (Read 951 times)
BlueBee
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« on: October 11, 2013, 08:49:29 PM »

How’s your apple crop this year?  I’ve never seen as many apples as we have here this year.  The apple trees around me went ape this year after going barren last year.  I have to laugh every time I pass a sign along the road where somebody is selling “deer apples”.  There’s so many apples in the woods, that even the deer must be sick of them by now.
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2013, 08:51:32 PM »

Bring me some. They are still so high here you have to have a ladder just to get high enough to see the price.
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GSF
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« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2013, 09:06:50 PM »

I've just started my apple adventure. I have 5 trees. One is about 4 years old, the rest are between 1 and 3 years. I have them to enjoy and also a back up food source. Love me some dehydrated apples, better yet some dehydrated figs. I think we have about 50 quarts of pressure canned apples left, or were they hw bath? They are good in many recipes but are awesome by their selves as well.

Ever heard of a Hackworth apple? When I was growing up they were all around here, everybody had them out by their barns or fields. The fruit is good, not something to go home running about but the trees were pretty much treatment free. I have one from a graft.

I love my trees, vines, and bushes. One of the great simple pleasures I have in life is to just mill around in the evening and pick grapes and eat them. Then when they are gone the scuppernongs are ready. Now the pomegranate's are just about there. My pecans will start falling in a few weeks. Before that was figs, blue berries, crab apples, pears, and probably something else. and i'm not overweight. Probably something to do with the 6 or 8 miles I walk every day at work.

...did I go off post or what...
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2013, 09:23:29 PM »

same here.  not just the apples, but every kind of fruit.  can't say the veggies did as well.  i am of the opinion that either we, or the game, are being fattened up for the kill.

if the aliens come, it's us.  if the world collapses, it's the deer.   evil

either way...i have never had a year like it!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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RC
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2013, 07:39:18 AM »

I also planted my first apple trees this year.Apples don't typically do very well in Florida, but UF has come out with a tree that's showing a lot of promise. We'll see.
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GSF
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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2013, 09:22:51 PM »

RC,

I've read about some new ones. They require very little chill hours. If I'm not mistaken you can buy some stuff and put it on? around? the tree and it'll think it has had the chill hours. The next county north of me (2 miles) is Chilton County. That area is widely know for it's peaches. I've heard of some of those hands using something like it on their peaches during a warm winter.
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

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RC
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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2013, 09:35:27 PM »

GSF,
I'd really be interested in researching that a little bit. If you remember where you saw that, PM me, please. The lack of chill hours here is the limiting factor for most apples.
The trees I planted are Tropic Sweet, a cross between a tree from the Bahamas and a tree from Israel. Supposed to be a really sweet apple,16 brix, I think.
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Burl
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« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2013, 12:42:47 PM »

  Yeah !   My son and I have started a fledgling orchard of around 100 fruit trees on about 1 1/2 acres .  The first little trees went in 5 years ago .  This fall we got to sample the first fruits .  They are an apple variety called Norkent .  They tasted mighty fine .  Just love the taste and aroma of fresh tree ripened apples .  Our region is on the cold end of the scale for having an orchard , with winter temps bottoming around -40 C. .  But we have concentrated on planting hardy varieties and are looking forward to Honeycrisp and Prairie Sensation . 
  This summer seemed ideal for growth , with lots of rain and mild nights .  This fall is happening as good as we could hope for as the new growth is hardening off real good .
  When the first snows come we will use that (snow) to mulch around the trees . We did that last winter and very little mortality and mouse ( bark chewing ) damage .  This week I hope to string the electric fence wire around the orchard to discourage deer , moose , and elk .  And , yes , we legally harvested one of those and will be enjoying it , served with applesauce , of course , all winter .
  It has been said that :  "Growing an apple tree is one of the most exciting slow things a person can do ." .  And I heard the question and replies :" When is the best time to plant an apple tree ?   Ten years ago .  Today is the second best time . "       Burl
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GSF
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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2013, 09:38:12 PM »

RC;

I believe they are called Anna. It's an Israeli apple requires something like 200-300 chill hours. I'm still thinking there's one out there that only requires something like 160 chill hours.
More info:
Pollinator required. Ein Shemer and Dorsett Golden are perfect pollinators for the Anna Apple tree.

Grows in zones: 6 - 9.
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

John Wayne
GSF
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« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2013, 08:40:01 PM »

RC: another update

http://www.evergreennursery.com/winter-chill-hours-for-fruit-trees

They talk about the Anna Apple here as well. Except they are saying around 100 chill hours. Seems to be a very popular tree in Southern California.

There's different opinions about how to define a chill hour.
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"Life is hard, It's even harder when you're stupid."

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RC
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« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2013, 03:25:15 PM »

Yeah, I have Tropic Sweet and Anna. Both are good for the south.
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