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Author Topic: Hello from Georgia  (Read 503 times)
Trufflehound
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Location: Columbia County, Georgia, United States


« on: October 09, 2013, 08:09:51 AM »

Well, I'm a new member from Georgia, but my wife won't exactly let me keep bees yet (not until we move some place with a larger backyard -- which we intend to do in the next year or so).  I think it's for the best, though; I'm learning a lot by reading the threads on this site and a few others. 

I'm planning on using 8 frames (I have children who would probably like to help, so anything larger than this may be too much), and maybe starting out with Italians.  I'd use Carniolans, but I've read that they're more prone to swarming, and I don't see myself keeping more than four hives.  Having no experience, I'm just theory-crafting.

In the mean time, I'll keep reading, learning, and I'll build the first couple of hives I'll start with.  I've been wanting to do this for a long time; can't wait to get started!
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tefer2
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Location: Kalamazoo,MI


« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2013, 08:26:02 AM »

Were excited for you too, welcome to the forum.
In the meantime you can post questions to get you started. Enjoy!
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mikecva
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Location: Northern Virginia USA


« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2013, 11:39:56 AM »

Welcome to the forum, Trufflehound.   cheer

You might also look into joining a local Beekeepers club. You can learn, make friends and maybe gain some hands on experience. My grand children started helping with the bees at age 5 and worked in the hives by 6-7.   -Mike



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Trufflehound
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Location: Columbia County, Georgia, United States


« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2013, 12:54:29 PM »

Welcome to the forum, Trufflehound.   cheer

You might also look into joining a local Beekeepers club. You can learn, make friends and maybe gain some hands on experience. My grand children started helping with the bees at age 5 and worked in the hives by 6-7.   -Mike
Thanks for the advice.  We have actually been looking into that.  My son's 4-H club has a beekeeping club attached to it, and we're talking about joining, buying the protective clothing, and building our hives.  We won't host any bees for quite some time, but we'd at least be better prepared for when we do.
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Joe D
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« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2013, 11:31:03 PM »

You might as well get to looking for that other place.  You already have the bug.  Beekeeping is addictive. Once you get a hive built the only set left is get your bees.  Good luck to you Trufflehound and welcome to the forum.




Joe
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amun-ra
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Location: Townsville north Queensland


« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2013, 05:19:49 AM »

Bee clubs are the best way to start  we have our meetings at a different members home each time and before the meeting starts we open up the members hive and have a look see you can step up and hold a frame or two and get up close and personal with the bees before you get your own.Gives a newbee a lot of confidence when you go solo at home Mick
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rwlaw
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Location: Grand Rapids Michigan


« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2013, 08:05:17 AM »

Greetings from Michigan, sounds like your like the youngsters want to get involved, that's great!
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Trufflehound
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Location: Columbia County, Georgia, United States


« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2013, 10:39:15 AM »

Thank you, everyone, for the welcoming and the advice. 

Is this an appropriate place to ask questions?  These may be better saved for a beekeepers' club meeting, but I'll ask away, anyhow. 

In my head, I think I'd like to start with Langstroth hives.  I would build four of them, but I would only use one or two initially.  The extras would eventually be used for splits.  I would also make these 8 frame mediums so that the kids wouldn't have too tough of a time with them once they're a little older.  Really, it's because I don't want to do heavy lifting; the kids just happen to be a very convenient (and welcomed) excuse.

I think we'll begin with Italians.  Carniolans sound better to me on paper, though, save for the swarming (but I imagine all bees do that to some extent).  Is swarming something you can expect once per year?  Or is it more often than that (or less)?  I know that the information I'm reading online is generalized, and there are probably several factors that go into it.  And is swarming something that the hobbyist wants to try and prevent?  Is it viewed as negligent to allow bees to go when you're beekeeping in a suburban area?  The answer may be to collect the swarm, transport them away from people, and release them; I'm not sure.  I think that the answers to this set of questions will determine what kind of bees we end up starting with.
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JPinMO
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Location: west central MO


« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2013, 01:57:40 AM »

Welcome, Trufflehound! I'm in my first year keeping as well, but I really see the value in going to all mediums - I wish we had done it.

My understanding is, you really don't need to worry about swarming if you have a new Queen. I'm presuming you'll be starting with packages. Swarm season here runs May/June and again around August, but check with your local Beeks; your warmer climate may shift those dates.

Definitely try to find a local Beek Club, and convince someone to mentor you -- it's invaluable! Here's a link to GA Beekeepers Assoc:
http://www.gabeekeeping.com/local_clubs.html
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