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Author Topic: Fast Track To Varroa  (Read 928 times)
Lone
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« on: September 29, 2013, 09:31:07 PM »

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-09-24/new-bee-imports/4978004

May as well burn your hives, folks, it'll be a faster death.

Lone
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hjon71
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« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2013, 12:25:03 AM »

Why import bees? Is there an issue with raising bees in Australia?  Corporate farming expanding beyond bee rearing capacity? Seems risky to me.
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prestonpaul
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2013, 12:48:43 AM »

Well that sucks,
As far as I know there is no issue raising bees here, we export them after all. Surely there is enough genetic diversity here for us not to need this? The only reason I can think to do this is to introduce Varoa resistant genetics but it seems a bit counter productive if you introduce Varoa a long with it!
This could be a good time to get to know your local member.
Or perhaps the federal minister for agriculture, Barnaby Joyce
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If you can keep your head when all about you are loosing theirs, you probably don't fully understand the situation!
ozbee
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2013, 03:26:49 AM »

queens brought into this country go  into quarantine  sealed from the outside world . from there eggs are grafted and checked for any disease or pathogens . the original queens are destroyed and never see outside the laboratory . the new queens get ai  and then destroyed  . eggs are grafted  of the ai  before she is killed and only then are released to queen breeders n. it is a very expensive exercise . australia has a great need for new stock as most lines are  becoming crossed as there is not a great gene pool in this country .
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hjon71
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2013, 05:38:36 AM »

Thanks ozbee for the clarification.
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Lone
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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2013, 07:24:46 PM »

Our DPI man only found out about this yesterday also and suggested contacting the state beekeepers association.  Here's the reply I received: "The idea of importing Canadian Queens is to help the Australian Beekeeper find a more respondent strain to deal with Varroa. There are certain import protocols in place to assure any risk will be addressed. Some of the protocols are that the Queen does not leave the Quarantine facility, only the grafted cells. The federal government has given the go ahead to this and further info can be sourced through AHBIC our peak body."

My question to people who see varroa everyday are: Is varroa ever seen off a bee with the potential to jump on the next bee?  How is varroa transferred between bees?

I'd also like to know if the bees from the nucs the canadian queens are added to are contained within walls.  I don't know why we can't import all the varroa resistant queens we need once varroa is already within our boarders.  It seems too risky to me.

Lone


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yantabulla
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« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2013, 05:54:43 AM »

Lone, the importation of queens is carefully managed.  If or when we get varroa it will be from a container ship or a sailing boat with a swarm carrying varroa mite.  Queensland already has asian bees that are a vector for varroa.  The importation of queens is zero risk and is actually introducing genetics for varroa resistance.  Relax.  Sugar shake your bees and be vigilant.  Yanta.
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Lone
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« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2013, 06:32:07 AM »

Yanta,
I'm hoping importing bees won't become too popular.  I do think the risk is less if they stay in Canada.  The Asian bees in Australia don't carry varroa so they are no more likely to be a vector than our more common european bees.  Sugar shaking will only tell us the bad news, but I did learn how to do it a couple of weeks ago.  Once we know we have varroa, it will be too late.
Ozbee, why can't they send over frozen drone semen if we need different genetics here?  After all, we have a world record holding texan longhorn near here bred through AI!

Having varroa here will be a blow for sure, but most especially in the chemicals that will be introduced in the honey and wax.  For now, I doubt my hives at home have access to chemicals.  In town you wouldn't know, but very little I guess compared with saving hives with the first onslaught of varroa.  I don't think us little hobbyists could afford any of these new lines of queens until maybe after a few decades the genes appear in feral bush hives.  I'm just speculating, but time will tell.

Lone

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amun-ra
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« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2013, 07:56:46 AM »

Asian honey bees are a natural host for varroa mites, if these mites were introduced into Australia from a new incursion of honey bees, the already established Asian honey bees would aid the spread of the mite, which would severely impact Australia's honey bee industry.DPI

By the way lone where did you get your lables printed?Huh Locally???
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Lone
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« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2013, 07:57:08 PM »

Quote
By the way lone where did you get your lables printed?Huh Locally???

Yes but I wouldn't recommend them.

By the way, are you going to the garden expo this weekend?  I want to get there for the 1130 bee session on saturday.

Lone
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amun-ra
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« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2013, 05:22:16 AM »

yes i should beee at the 11.30 session saturday see you there

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ozbee
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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2013, 10:08:34 PM »

they are hesitant because some bee virus can survive freezing, work is being done to fix this problem ,hence the stoppage of bee sperm at present
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100 TD
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« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2013, 07:28:51 PM »

Varroa is in New Guinea and New Zealand, my GUESS is that if it's in NG, then it's already on the cape, we just don't have heaps of beeks up there to find out!
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ozbee
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« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2013, 06:27:45 PM »

australia is heavily monitored as well as a trapping and baiting system in place over the islands as well as the top end . varorra is only on one island just of the coast of PNG . making foolhardy guess puts australian exports at risk so check whats in place before making the leap.
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